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A Streetcar Named Desire Details

FULL SYNOPSIS

In the classic play by Tennessee Williams, brought to the screen by Elia Kazan, faded Southern belle Blanche DuBois (Vivien Leigh) comes to visit her pregnant sister, Stella (Kim Hunter), in a seedy section of New Orleans. Stella's boorish husband, Stanley Kowalski (Marlon Brando), not only regards Blanche's aristocratic affectations as a royal pain but also thinks she's holding out on inheritance money that rightfully belongs to Stella. On the fringes of sanity, Blanche is trying to forget her checkered past and start life anew. Attracted to Stanley's friend Mitch (Karl Malden), she glosses over the less savory incidents in her past, but she soon discovers that she cannot outrun that past, and the stage is set for her final, brutal confrontation with her brother-in-law. Brando, Hunter, and Malden had all starred in the original Broadway version of Streetcar, although the original Blanche had been Jessica Tandy. Brando lost out to Humphrey Bogart for the 1951 Best Actor Oscar, but Leigh, Hunter, and Malden all won Oscars. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

  • Release date:January 1, 1951

Awards

Awarded by
Nominee
Category
Year
Status
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Lucinda Ballard Best Black and White Costume Design 1951 Nominee
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Marlon Brando Best Actor 1951 Nominee
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Alex North Best Drama or Comedy Score 1951 Nominee
Venice International Film Festival Elia Kazan Special Jury Prize 1951 Winner
New York Film Critics Circle Elia Kazan Best Director 1951 Winner
Directors Guild of America Elia Kazan Best Director 1951 Nominee
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Elia Kazan Best Director 1951 Nominee
British Academy of Film and Television Arts Elia Kazan Best Film - Any Source 1952 Nominee
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Karl Malden Best Supporting Actor 1951 Winner
Hollywood Foreign Press Association Kim Hunter Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture 1951 Winner
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Kim Hunter Best Supporting Actress 1951 Winner
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Richard Day Best Black and White Art Direction 1951 Winner
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Tennessee Williams Best Screenplay 1951 Nominee
Venice International Film Festival Vivien Leigh Volpi Cup for Best Actress 1951 Winner
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Vivien Leigh Best Actress 1951 Winner
New York Film Critics Circle Vivien Leigh Best Actress 1951 Winner
Hollywood Foreign Press Association Vivien Leigh Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture - Drama 1951 Nominee
British Academy of Film and Television Arts Vivien Leigh Best British Actress 1952 Winner
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Harry Stradling Best Black and White Cinematography 1951 Nominee

Cast

Vivien Leigh
as Blanche Dubois
Marlon Brando
as Stanley Kowalski
Kim Hunter
as Stella Kowalski
Karl Malden
as Harold "Mitch" Mitchell
Rudy Bond
as Steve Hubbell
Peg Hillias
as Eunice Hubbell
Richard Garrick
as Doctor
Edna Thomas
as Mexican Woman
Marietta Canty
as Black Woman
Maxie Thrower
as Passersby
Mickey Kuhn
as Sailor
Charles Wagenheim
Mel Archer
as Foreman
Lyle Latell
as Policeman

Crew

Elia Kazan
Director
Tennessee Williams
Play Author
Tennessee Williams
Screenwriter
Oscar Saul
Screenwriter
Harry Stradling
Cinematographer
Ray Heindorf
Musical Direction/Supervision
Alex North
Composer (Music Score)
David Weisbart
Editor
Richard Day
Art Director
Lucinda Ballard
Costume Designer
Nathan Levinson
Sound Director
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