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You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger Review

Movies.com Critics

1.0

Dave White Profile

Not if you're lucky, you won't. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    51

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    Slight and only sporadically amusing.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    The movie ends just when complications start to set in, which makes you wonder how invested Allen really is in the little melodramas within this comedy.

    Read Full Review

  • 58

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    The best scenes are hilarious sessions between the great Gemma Jones and the wonderful Pauline Collins as a charlatan fortune-teller.

    Read Full Review

  • 70

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    Good and very pleasurable provided you know what you're getting into, which is a comic roundelay of amorous ambitions and delusions-punctuated by wistful old ballads like "If I Had You"-that lead mostly but not entirely to disaster.

    Read Full Review

  • See all You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 16+

Woody Allen revisits familiar themes in mature comedy.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this mature comedy revisits complex themes that director Woody Allen often explores in his movies, including marriage, infidelity, and career ennui. There’s frank talk about marital dissatisfaction and plenty of grass-is-greener yearning. Most of it will likely go over the head of tweens and younger teens (not that they're likely to be interested), though older ones inclined to philosophizing may find it interesting. Expect some swearing (including "f--k") and drinking and images of women in their underwear.

  • Families can talk about what the movie is saying about marriage. Do the relationships in the movie seem realistic? What happens when they don't work out?
  • How does this movie compare to Allen's other films?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: The movie makes the point that life is filled with random swerves -- which we can either manage and embrace on our own, or we can turn to fortune-tellers, mentors, or other “gurus” for enlightenment (or at least company). Ultimately, we are the masters and mistresses of our own triumphs and disasters.

  • rolemodels true0

    Role models: Although the film is peopled by insensitive, self-absorbed types of the kind you often see in Woody Allen movies, few of them appear to mean anyone else any outright harm (except for the character who cheats on her spouse and thinks it means nothing and the fake fortune teller who spins predictions for money). Also, a wife can't mask her dissatisfaction with her marriage; a woman is inconsiderate toward her son-in-law; a husband, afraid of growing old, leaves his wife for a younger woman; and a man takes advantage of a situation that he thinks will hurt no one and benefit him.

What to watch for
  • violence false1

    Violence: Some yelling and screaming among family members. A character breaks into an apartment.

  • sex false2

    Sex: A man massages a married woman’s leg and is later seen making out with her. Characters are glimpsed undressing down to their underwear through an open window. A woman parades around in front of her husband in a negligee. Couples kiss.

  • language false3

    Language: Words include “damn,” “goddamn,” “bloody," “ass,” “hell,” and (infrequently) f--k.”

  • consumerism false2

    Consumerism: One shot of the label for Viagra and another of Corona. Some store shopping brands seen. A man wears Ralph Lauren-logoed sweaters.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false2

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: A woman often asks others for something to drink while she’s visiting, usually sherry or whiskey. Later, her daughter calls her out on her fondness for liquor. A couple drinks beer while lounging on a picnic blanket at the park.

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