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Wet Hot American Summer Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    42

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 100

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Owen Gleiberman

    The movie is so hilariously sly about something so fetishistically trivial that at times it appears to take in an entire culture through a lens made of cheese.

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  • 25

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    I want to escape, Oh, Muddah Faddah -- Life's too short for cinematic torture.

    Read Full Review

  • 38

    out of 100

    USA Today

    The writing here is rarely funny, and often trite and predictable. A couple of scenes are downright disturbing:

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  • 38

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Robert K. Elder

    This low-budget comedy will most likely try the patience of a paying audience with its uneven pacing, wavering tone and poor production quality.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Wet Hot American Summer reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Pause for kids 16 & under

Hilarious but raunchy parody is filled with sex, profanity.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Wet Hot American Summer is a 2001 parody of early 1980s summertime coming-of-age teen flicks and, as such, contains frequent references to teen characters wanting to have sex. Two male characters are shown sneaking off into a supply shed to have sex; they're shown nude from the waist up, kissing and holding each other close. During a montage in which the camp counselors go to town for supplies, the counselors are shown smoking cigarettes, drinking beer, smoking pot, buying cocaine, and shooting up heroin in a rundown drug house. Profanity is frequently employed (especially "f--k"), and, although the movie is one of the funniest movies released in recent history, the profanity and overall mature content make this film most appropriate for older teens and up. Still, for all its awareness of the form it's parodying, it's unafraid to celebrate those who are "different," even going so far as to have a gay marriage between two of the lead male characters and everyone in camp celebrating the milestone.

  • Families can talk about films that parody specific genres. As a movie parodying movies such as Meatballs and other summertime coming-of-age movies from the early 1980s, what styles do the filmmakers employ with the scenes and the characters to create comedy?
  • Where does the movie break from the form it's parodying?
  • Why do you think there was so much profanity and so many references to sex? Do you think it was necessary to parody the original movies, or did this seem gratuitous?

The good stuff
  • message true2

    Messages: In its own unique way, this movie shows that it's OK to be different. For instance, when two male characters learn that one of their best friends is gay and has gotten married to his boyfriend, they buy him a chaise lounge. The "inside kids" -- those who are more interested in science or Dungeons & Dragons instead of outdoor camping activities -- meet a local professor of astrophysics, who takes them under his wing and teaches them about the universe.

  • rolemodels true0

    Role models: In this satire of early 1980s summertime coming-of-age movies, none of the characters emerges from comedic archetypes to be a positive role model.

What to watch for
  • violence false1

    Violence: Comedic pratfalls throughout the movie. A boy is thrown out of a van while it's in motion.

  • sex false4

    Sex: Frequent references to sex throughout the movie. When the woman in charge of the camp is about to go into town for supplies, one of the female counselors asks if she will buy her some lube, because it's "for her p--sy." Male characters spy on female characters who strip down to their bikinis as they make lewd comments about their bodies. Two male characters are shown sneaking off into a supply shed to have sex; they are shown nude from the waist up, kissing and holding each other close. Two female camp counselors make out during the climax of the movie. Male and female characters are frequently shown making out and openly discussing having sex. During one make-out scene, a female camp counselor grabs a male camp counselor in the groin and lifts him up. The head cafeteria chef admits to everyone that he likes to "hump the fridge" and is briefly shown engaging in the act while fully clothed.

  • language false4

    Language: Frequent profanity throughout the movie. "F--k" is used often. Variations on "s--t" are frequently said. The word "dyke" is used, and so is the word "fag." In one of the film's more absurd moments, a can of vegetables says that it can "suck its own d--k."

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not applicable

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: During a montage in which the camp counselors go to town for supplies, the counselors are shown smoking cigarettes, drinking beer, smoking pot, buying cocaine, and shooting up heroin in a rundown drug house.

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