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Tyler Perry's I Can Do Bad All By Myself Review

Movies.com Critics

1.0

Dave White Profile

Good. Then leave me out of it. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    55

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 60

    out of 100

    The New York Times Neil Genzlinger

    Mr. Perry has his moviemaking machine running smoothly, which is to say somewhat predictably.

    Read Full Review

  • 60

    out of 100

    Variety

    Perry's latest emotional roller coaster starts with considerable promise and a high-wattage cast, including Taraji P. Henson and singers Gladys Knight and Mary J. Blige, before giving way to melodramatic predictability.

    Read Full Review

  • 60

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter

    Part musical, part love story, part family melodrama, part inspirational treacle, Tyler Perry's latest movie, I Can Do Bad All by Myself is something of an unholy mess. Alternately stupefying and entertaining, the film does benefit from a strong cast.

    Read Full Review

  • 70

    out of 100

    Los Angeles Times

    What works best, though, is that it's practically an R&B/gospel musical.

    Read Full Review

  • 91

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    It's probably the impresario's best-made movie yet, his most joyful, and his most moving.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Tyler Perry's I Can Do Bad All By Myself reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 14+

Sometimes-gritty dramedy has some moving moments.

What Parents Need to Know

Parent need to know that this dramedy based on a play by Tyler Perry is both gritty and righteous. Although, like Perry's other films, it ends on a decidedly optimistic (if unsurprising) note, the main character is an iffy role model throughout much of the movie -- she smokes, drinks, and shows no compassion toward her sister’s young children, who all need her help. The movie also examines the tragic toll of child abuse and includes a scene of near-sexual assault on a teenage girl.

  • Families can talk about April. Is she meant to be considered a role model? What prevents her from embracing those who need her and/or care for her? Why does she have so many vices?
  • What message do you think the movie is ultimately sending? Is Perrysaying that you need to have a partner by your side to take on life’schallenges? Is that par for the course for more mainstream Hollywoodmovies?

The good stuff
  • message true2

    Messages: Perry’s messages of faith and hope shine through, which many viewers may find inspiring. But his chauvinism does, too: Main character April can’t seem to be saved without a man, and though she’s a strong character, a not-so-subtle undercurrent leaves the impression that a woman needs a “good man” to make her way through this world intact.

  • rolemodels true2

    Role models: The main character spends much of the movie being cold and selfish, even heartless (and her boyfriend is even nastier) -- but she ultimately experiences a huge sea change/epiphany. The supporting characters are actually far more appealing, with big hearts and obvious (to the point of being nearly one-dimensional) goodness.

What to watch for
  • violence false3

    Violence: A married man makes inappropriate, aggressive advances toward a teenager -- to the point of almost raping her. Two men end up in a bloody fight. A woman nearly kills a man by electrocuting him. Two comic characters jokingly threaten to dispense corporal punishment to set kids straight.

  • sex false2

    Sex: A woman messes around with a married man, but the audience doesn’t really see anything except them in bed under the covers. In another scene, a man and a woman share a gentle kiss.

  • language false2

    Language: Mild swearing, including one use of "s--t" and several instances of words like "ass," “hell,” "damn," and “shut up.” Also "oh my God."

  • consumerism false1

    Consumerism: While characters are seen dressed to the nines, there’s little mention of brands -- though the Heineken label gets screen time.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: A woman practically chain smokes her way through the movie; she also drinks so much that her friend calls her on it. A joint is mentioned but never seen on screen.

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