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The Nanny Diaries Review

Movies.com Critics

2.5

Dave White Profile

… needs to be funnier and not so warm and huggy. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    46

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 30

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal

    So tightly constructed of clichés, stereotypes and chick-lit tropes that it's inert; no fresh air can blow in.

    Read Full Review

  • 42

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Owen Gleiberman

    For a light comedy, The Nanny Diaries turns out to have an off-putting theme. It glorifies the romance of slumming.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    The very rich are different from you and me. And much worse. That's basically the message of the disappointingly banal Nanny Diaries, a film that is even more lightweight and clichéd than the fluff that was the best-selling book.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    The comedy has several inspired moments and a genuine flair for the satiric, but overall the film leaves you cold.

    Read Full Review

  • See all The Nanny Diaries reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 13+

Where's Mary Poppins when you need her?

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that although teens might love Scarlett Johansson, this movie is about nannies and employee/employer relations -- hardly a big topic of interest for the average 13 year old. Many parents are presented as overprivileged, immature prima donnas. The strain between the central "bad" parent (an upper-class New Yorker) and her less-upper-crust nanny leads to some sad, tense scenes featuring a young boy, as well as some frank discussion of parenting goals and strategies. The film also includes mild sexual imagery (cleavage, kissing, a couple of uncomfortable groping scenes) and drinking (mostly social, though at one point Annie deliberately gets drunk). Language includes one use of "f--k" in anger, plus "s--t," "hell," and the other usual suspects.

  • Families can talk about the movie's main conflict: Why does Annie think Mrs. X is a bad parent? Do you agree with her? Why or why not? What makes someone a "good" or "bad" mom or dad? Is it different in real life than it is in movies and on TV shows? How? Do you think Mrs. X thinks she's a good mom? What is Annie's role in the X family? How does she see herself compared to how the Xs see her?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: Family members lie to one another, and class differences lead to tension and judgment. The Xs aren't exactly involved, emotionally connected parents.

What to watch for
  • violence false0

    Violence: A little boy kicks his new nanny in the shins; some other pratfall-type moments.

  • sex false3

    Sex: The movie's opening fantasy includes a museum diorama of a pole dancer, Annie's thong is visible when Grayer pulls down her pants, and her cleavage is highly visible when she wears a Betsy Ross costume for the Fourth of July. Mrs. X shows Annie a sexy slip. Rowdy college boys say that dating a nanny is "so porno!" Some kissing in a hallway, followed by a crashing sound from behind a closed door -- insinuating a passionate embrace. Mr. X is seen by his son in mid-fondle with his coworker; the older man later makes a grab at Annie's bottom.

  • language false3

    Language: At least one use of "f--k," plus several instances each of "hell," "s--t," and "damn," as well as one "dumb ass" and one "bastard."

  • consumerism false3

    Consumerism: Frequent mentions or shots of brand names and corporations, including Goldman Sachs, Dior, Louis Vuitton, Bergdorff's, Chanel, Manolo Blahnik, Tiffany, SpongeBob SquarePants, Converse All-Stars, Lay's potato chips, Cheerios, Ralph Lauren polo shirt.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: An anonymous nanny smokes a cigarette; some social drinking of wine, champagne, and beer. In one scene Annie deliberately gets drunk (on wine).

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