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The House Bunny Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    55

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 30

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal

    Unfortunately, Ms. Faris has neither an adroit script -- House Bunny is a stale collection of dumb bunny jokes -- nor Ms. Witherspoon's wily charm. And the filmmakers do Ms. Faris no favors by inviting comparisons to Marilyn Monroe.

    Read Full Review

  • 63

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    Bunny is fashioned as a bawdy comedy with heart, but its reliance on formula undercuts the amusing moments.

    Read Full Review

  • 67

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    The movie flaunts its comedy roots like a messy bleach job.

    Read Full Review

  • 70

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Michael Rechtshaffen

    Manages to stand on its own two skyscraper heels thanks to the comic force of nature that is Anna Faris.

    Read Full Review

  • See all The House Bunny reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 14+

Some laughs, but an iffy message for girls.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that although this fluffy college-set comedy is supposedly about why it's important to be yourself, it has some iffy messages for the tween and young teen girls who are most likely to want to see it -- chiefly, that women need to doll themselves up to attract the opposite sex. Since main character Shelley is a Playboy bunny, sex in general is a main theme of the movie, even though the only "action" is a couple of kisses. There are constant references to Playboy: The mansion, the magazine, and Hugh Hefner himself all play central roles in the plot. Scenes set in the mansion include scads of barely dressed bunnies wearing revealing lingerie or tiny bikinis, and Shelley does the same even after she leaves (in one scene, the entire length of her nude body is visible from the back). Characters also discuss sex and virginity. One sorority sister is pregnant, but her pregnancy is used like a prop instead of taken seriously. Language includes one "f--k" and many uses of "bitch," and characters drink frequently (though generally not to excess) at both the mansion and college parties.

  • Families can talk about whether Shelley is a good role model. Is her dream of becoming a Playboy centerfold an admirable one? What do the Zeta sisters learn from her? What does she learn from them? What is the movie's message about young women? What does "sisterhood" mean, according to the Zetas? Ultimately, does the movie reinforce stereotypes or undermine them?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: Although the movie's ostensible message is that everyone should just be who they are, young female viewers are much more likely to get the idea that they need to be thin, tan, and dolled up to be sexy and attractive to the opposite sex. While there's nothing wrong with wanting to look nice, the Zeta girls go from not caring a fig for how they look to (temporarily) becoming just as judgmental and looks-obsessed as the sorority girls they disliked. Shelley's dream is to be a Playboy centerfold. On the other hand, at least Shelley makes philanthropy cool (even if she can't say the word properly). The Iota Mu sisters are typical movie "mean girls," doing their best to humiliate the Zetas and stand in the way of their success. A girl in a back brace is mocked.

What to watch for
  • violence false1

    Violence: A woman violently twists the nipples of a man she's angry with (but he actually enjoys it); Shelley gets hurt standing over a steaming manhole cover. Several pratfalls.

  • sex false4

    Sex: All of the scenes featuring Playboy bunnies show women nearly undressed. Shelley walks around in lingerie, bikinis, or other cleavage-bearing outfits all the time. She disrobes in front of the sorority, and her nude body is visible from the back for a few seconds. As for actual sex, there isn't any, but there are a couple of quick kisses and lots of flirting and conversations about virginity/hooking up (including a symbolic "sacrifice" of one of the virginal sorority sisters). One male character is in thrall of a woman who turns him on by twisting his nipples painfully. Star Anna Faris appeared in Playboy (though not fully naked) at the time of the film's premiere.

  • language false3

    Language: Mostly the word "bitch" and its variations, plus one "f--kin'" and body parts like "nipples," "boobies," "penis," etc.

  • consumerism false3

    Consumerism: The Playboy brand, the Playboy mansion, and Hugh Hefner are featured throughout the film. Also shown are Haagen-Dazs ice cream and the make-up store Sephora. Shelley mentions a Prius.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Lots of drinking at the Playboy mansion and the college campus' Greek parties, where presumably some students are under 21.

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