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The Hours Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 5.0
    81

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Universal acclaim
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 67

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    While we can admire their attractive exteriors, we don't know anything about the interior lives of the three women so vibrantly miserable in their unhappiness.

    Read Full Review

  • 75

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    Richly layered, deliberately paced, dealing with difficult emotions and life decisions, it feels like a moody wintry afternoon.

    Read Full Review

  • 88

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    For a movie audience, The Hours doesn't connect in a neat way, but introduces characters who illuminate mysteries of sex, duty and love.

    Read Full Review

  • 90

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    The links and resonances remain largely abstract -- to understand them isn't necessarily to be moved by them -- while the individual dramas of those three lives are often stirring, and the three starring performances are unforgettable.

  • See all The Hours reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 15+

Smart, thoughtful movie for older teens and up.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this movie has tense and sad situations, including two suicides and one near-suicide. A character speaks of having to have a serious operation. There are sexual references and situations, including artificial insemination and same-sex kisses. Characters use strong language. Gay and bi-sexual characters are positively portrayed though sometimes anguished and isolated.

  • Families can talk about what this means, and how most of us are defined and define ourselves not by huge heroic adventures but by small connections and kindnesses. What did Virginia, Laura, and Clarissa find to give value and meaning to their lives? They have people to love and people who love them - what are they missing, and why? What is the significance of those three kisses, none of which seems to give the characters the comfort and intimacy they are seeking? Why does Cunningham give us three stories touched by the fictional character created by Woolf? Does he think that any of his characters are successful? How can you tell? What book could inspire you as Cunningham was inspired by Woolf?

What to watch for
  • violence false0

    Violence: None Suicides

  • sex false3

    Sex: Sexual references and situations including same-sex kisses

  • language false3

    Language: Some strong language

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Drinking, smoking, and prescription drug use

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