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The Haunting in Connecticut Review

Movies.com Critics

2.0

Dave White Profile

Because when you think "fear," you think Connecticut. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 2.0
    33

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Generally unfavorable reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 42

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly

    Smart enough to put much of its weight on Gallner, a lively presence with a terrifically sour mug that makes him look like a mutual cousin of Willem Dafoe and Peter Lorre.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    Although it's reasonably well-acted and offers a few certifiable jolts, feels awfully familiar.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    A technically proficient horror movie and well acted.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Michael Phillips

    The movie bumps along from low-grade scare to scare, and it's not lousy, mainly because Virginia Madsen prevents it from being so.

    Read Full Review

  • 60

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter

    Haunting tweaks familiar tropes enough to make them interesting. Just not so interesting as to inspire many nightmares after the credits roll.

    Read Full Review

  • See all The Haunting in Connecticut reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 14+

Unoriginal, shoddy horror film is too gory for young kids.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this is a review of the movie shown in theaters and not the Unrated Special Edition, which is sure to have scarier, raw content. This "based on a true story" horror film, while milder than movies like Saw, is still too scary and disturbing for kids. It's full of mutilated bodies, bloody scenes, supernatural violence, and medical and autopsy imagery. There are also fairly serious discussions of the challenges facing a teen fighting cancer. One character is a recovering alcoholic who starts drinking again and ends up driving drunk. But the language doesn't get much stronger than "hell" and "oh my God," and sex and product placement aren't an issue.

  • Families can talk about the appeal of horror movies -- why do we like to watch things that scare us?
  • Which is scarier: a movie with a ghostly villain or one with areal-life bad guy? Why?
  • How accurate do movieshave to be when they're "based on a true story"? Can filmmakers makechanges even when they're using that label? Is that OK? Why would they want to change things?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: No strong/obvious positive messages. The question "Why do bad things hapen to good people?" is asked. Characters also talk about how "the Lord works in mysterious ways" and frankly discuss how alcohol and alcoholism affect a marriage and a family.

  • rolemodels true0

    Role models: No strong/obvious positive role models. Characters (including a young teen) face cancer and are concerned about being able to afford medical treatment.

What to watch for
  • violence false4

    Violence: Plenty of violence and gore, with extensive depiction of blood, scars, cuts, wounds, and mass graves filled with emaciated, mutilated corpses. Ghosts take the form of mutilated corpses. Close-ups of medical instruments and procedures undertaken in the name of dark magic/sorcery/paranormal experimentation. Supernatural violence as restless spirits shove, push, and batter victims.

  • sex false1

    Sex: A woman is in the shower, but nothing sensitive is shown.

  • language false2

    Language: Fairly mild, including "Jesus" as an expletive, "good Lord," "oh my God," and "hell."

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Characters drink hard liquor. A recovering alcoholic starts drinking again, driving drunk and frightening his family; he later apologizes, atones, and tries to make amends.

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