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The Family Stone Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    56

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 50

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Sheri Linden

    Spends too much time on unconvincing romantic-comedy contrivances to be consistently engaging. Throughout the uneven film and its mixed bag of performances, the compelling point of focus is Diane Keaton's smart, funny, spot-on natural portrait of the formidable Stone matriarch.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    Parker has a great time being the anti–Carrie Bradshaw while Keaton-as-matriarch is a particular joy -- funny, beautiful, elegant, touching, and at ease with a familiar, get-out-your-hankies holiday subplot.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    USA Today Mike Clark

    As stuffed with beguiling performances - some of them unexpectedly good - as its script is overstuffed. And though even the beguiled may feel manipulated the next morning (or when hitting the exits), the players put it over by a nose. Happy holidays.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    Silly at times, leaning toward the screwball tradition of everyone racing around the house at the same time in a panic fueled by serial misunderstandings. There is also a thoughtful side.

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  • See all The Family Stone reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 14+

Bittersweet story won't appeal to younger teens.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this romantic comedy focuses on family tensions emerging when grown children come home for the Christmas holidays. Characters argue and pout; brothers fight, causing black eyes and cut cheeks. Characters drink at a bar, to the point that one passes out and doesn't remember how she ends up in her fiancé's brother's bed. One character is accused of racism, homophobia, and general "uptightness." While it's mainly comedic, the movie also includes a plot thread where a character is dying of cancer (brief glimpse of her mastectomy scar).

  • Families can talk about the family relationships. How do the kids' behaviors resemble their parents'? How do the Stones come to see their presumed open-mindedness as insular and judgmental? How might Meredith's transformation from tense to sociable (here pushed along by a night of drinking), be achieved in a less stereotypical way?

The good stuff
  • message true3

    Messages: Holidays are stressful, but family members really love each other.

What to watch for
  • violence false0

    Violence: Some fighting between brothers, treated as comedy and leaving black eyes and cut faces.

  • sex false3

    Sex: Sexual activity hinted at (woman wakes up in wrong brother's bed); gay couple kisses chastely; parents kiss and snuggle in bed, revealing very briefly the mother's mastectomy scar.

  • language false3

    Language: Minor language ("damn," "s--t").

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Brief shot of Santa/Norelco ad on TV; beer labels visible in bar; an NPR logo marks a character's "liberal" leanings.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Drinking in bar, to point of passing out and forgetting the evening; references to pot-smoking.

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