Share

Watch It

On DVD: Now | On Blu-ray: TBD

Save the Last Dance Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    53

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 42

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    This wan, formulaic teen movie from ''Metro'' director Thomas Carter is afraid to pump up the volume on its own interracial, hip hop Romeo and Juliet story, lest it challenge even one sedated viewer or disturb the peace.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Susan Wloszczyna

    Thomas' easygoing warmth helps to melt Stiles' icy veneer, and one of Dance's few pleasures is an extended musical segment where she tries to ape his homeboy posturings.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    This teenage interracial romance runs hot and cold, sweet and silly, with many more fits than starts.

  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    Above all, this is a movie where the characters ask the same questions we do: They're as smart about themselves as we are.

    Read Full Review

  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Mark Caro

    Sure, you've seen some of these moves before, but Save the Last Dance triumphantly passes the audition.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Save the Last Dance reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 13+

Formulaic teen romance with an MTV spin.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this movie has strong language, and the soundtrack lyrics have even stronger language, including the "N" word. Chenille has an out of wedlock child (and a difficult relationship with the child's father). Derek has to decide whether his loyalty to an old friend (and his sense of guilt at the friend's having taken the rap for them both) means that he must go along with him when he plans to shoot someone. Characters object to the interracial romance, mostly because they are jealous. The characters buy fake IDs so they can go to a club that serves liquor, and they drink and smoke.

  • Families can talk about the choices Sara and Derek must face. Sara blames herself for her mother's death. How does she overcome that feeling and allow herself to take the risk of auditioning again? How do Derek and Sara get into trouble by not being honest with each other about what is bothering them? How do they sort through their loyalties, Derek to his friend Malakai (Fredro Starr) and Sara to Chenille? Malakai tells Derek, "You act like you don't know who you are anymore." How do Sara and Derek decide who they are? Where do they find their support?

What to watch for
  • violence false3

    Violence: Characters involved in violence, car crash, parental death.

  • sex false3

    Sex: Teen character has out of wedlock child, some sexual references.

  • language false4

    Language: Typical high school-style strong language, very strong language in soundtrack rap songs.

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Teen characters drink and smoke, fake ID.

Advertisement