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Romy and Michele's High School Reunion Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    59

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Susan Wloszczyna

    Isn't smart enough to cut it as the ultimate blond joke. [25 April 1997, p. 4D]

  • 58

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    This sloppy, pleasant comedy by playwright and TV producer Robin Schiff (Almost Perfect) is an amiable mess, a padded-out expansion of a play called "Ladies' Room."

    Read Full Review

  • 75

    out of 100

    ReelViews James Berardinelli

    One of those pleasant movie-going experiences that doesn't offend, excite, or challenge anyone. There are all sorts of likable things about it.

    Read Full Review

  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    It has charm, a sly intelligence, and the courage to go for special effects sequences.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Romy and Michele's High School Reunion reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 15+

Silly comedy about superficial pals has lots of profanity.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that most of the common curse words ("f--k," "s--t") get a workout here. The main characters lie about their accomplishments to impress others and seem to believe that appearances are more important than hard work, good intentions, and decency. Michele is so intent on borrowing a Jaguar to impress former classmates that she audibly pretends to have sex with a man who owns a nice car so he can elevate his image in the view of their eavesdropping coworkers. A married alcoholic suggests he and Romy take a hotel room to have sex. One character, who regularly used to grab a quick secret smoke between classes in high school, makes her fortune in the cigarette business.

  • Families can talk about whether personal happiness can be more important than material success.
  • Romy and Michele lie about their achievements to impress others. Is it ever worth the risk of lying to impress others?
  • People change as they grow older. What do you think you will be like at your reunion? What about your friends?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: Romy and Michele lie about their accomplishments to impress others and seem to believe that appearances are more important than hard work, good intentions, and decency. They may be low on brains, but they register high on the drive spectrum. When they set their minds on looking pretty for their upcoming high school reunion, they sweat it off at the gym, make flashy new clothes, and creatively find a way to borrow a snazzy ride to the party.

  • rolemodels true1

    Role models: The girls are not what most parents would hope their children to be, that is, obsessed with all things superficial -- looks, clothes, body size, cute guys, living in a cool place, and other people's view of them. But they do love each other and despite the relationship's ups and downs, display an unflagging loyalty to each other.

What to watch for
  • violence false0

    Violence: Not applicable

  • sex false2

    Sex: Michele and Romy go dancing wearing sexy but body-covering outfits and they are on the prowl for boyfriends. In exchange for borrowing a guy's Jaguar, Michele verbally pretends to have sex with the car's owner so that coworkers on the other side of a closed door hear their fake moans. A drunken married man suggests he and Romy take a room to have sex.

  • language false4

    Language: Expect the liberal use of "f--k," "s--t," "jerk off," "bitch," "hell," "a--hole," "erection," "penis" and "turd."

  • consumerism false1

    Consumerism: Romy is a cashier at a Jaguar dealership and the brand is seen in several scenes. The friends claim they invented Post-It's.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false2

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: At least two characters smoke, one made her fortune in the cigarette business, and at least one character is an alcoholic who is sloppily inebriated.

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