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The Railway Man Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    59

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 40

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    Nothing if not ambitious, yet at war with itself stylistically.

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  • 50

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter David Rooney

    The Railway Man is well-acted and handsomely produced, but its honorable intentions are not matched with sustained emotional impact or psychological suspense.

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  • 60

    out of 100

    Village Voice Alan Scherstuhl

    It's heartening to have a tony war film about PTSD and forgiveness; it would be grander still to have one that dedicated itself more fully to examining the courage it would take to offer that forgiveness, rather than dash its energies upon the dreary cowardice of the crime itself.

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  • 60

    out of 100

    Variety Peter Debruge

    There’s something decidedly old-fashioned — and also dull as ditchwater — about Jonathan Teplitzky’s retelling of events.

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  • 63

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    For a well-acted movie about the horrors of war and the lure of revenge, it's surprisingly dull and starchy.

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  • 63

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Michael Phillips

    Even when the film's cheating, Firth refuses to tidy up the fictionalized Lomax's emotional state. The actor, so good at playing stalwart men contending with inner demons, can utter a simple line — "I don't think I can be put back together" — and break your heart, legitimately, without histrionics.

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  • 67

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Adam Markovitz

    Colin Firth smolders as the PTSD-riddled veteran (played in flashbacks by War Horse‘s Jeremy Irvine), and Nicole Kidman cries dutifully as his wife — but they’re both derailed by the movie’s tidy emotional resolutions.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Richard Roeper

    Sometimes The Railway Man is hard to watch. It’s also hard to imagine anyone watching it and not being deeply moved.

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  • See all The Railway Man reviews at Metacritic.com

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