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Radio Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 2.0
    38

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Generally unfavorable reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 30

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    Mr. Gooding is out there in almost every scene, and the destruction of his once-promising career proceeds apace.

  • 40

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    The cast, which includes Alfre Woodard and Debra Winger, manages to give thoughtful performances that salvage the film's integrity.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    Though probably well-intentioned, Radio comes off as manipulative of its audience and exploitative of the mentally challenged.

    Read Full Review

  • 58

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    Radio is assembled from small, hard stones of ignorance and intolerance paved over by large, mushy examples of community goodness.

    Read Full Review

  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    There is no cynicism in Radio, no angle or edge. It's about what it's about, with an open, warm and fond nature. Every once in a while human nature expresses itself in a way we can feel good about, and this is one of those times.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Radio reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 11+

Lesson of kindness permeates inspiring true story.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this movie has a couple of bad words and a sad death (off-screen). In a cruel prank, Radio is sent into the girls' locker room (nothing shown). Characters are cruel but learn their lesson. Even though it is set in the South in the decade after the Civil Rights Act was passed, the movie avoids stereotyping the white residents as racist.

  • Families can talk about disabled people they know and how they are treated. They could also talk about why Radio was so important to Coach Jones, and how sometimes, if we cannot correct a mistake we make at the time, we can find a way to use what we have learned to prevent another mistake in the future. They could talk about how the coach decided what his priorities really were and about how Radio showed that he understood some things better than people who thought they were smarter than he was.

The good stuff
  • message true3

    Messages: Characters are cruel but learn their lesson. Even though it is set in the South in the decade after the Civil Rights Act was passed, the movie avoids stereotyping the white residents as racist.

What to watch for
  • violence false3

    Violence: Some tense moments; sad death (off-screen).

  • sex false0

    Sex: Radio is sent into the girls' locker room as a cruel prank; nothing is shown.

  • language false3

    Language: A couple of bad words.

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false0

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Not an issue

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