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New York Minute Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 2.0
    33

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Generally unfavorable reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 25

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    The movie may be more bogus than a Gucci bag for sale on a Fifth Avenue sidewalk, but at least the backgrounds are real.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Mike Clark

    As far as acting goes, neither Olsen is ready for Euripides' Medea, yet each projects well enough in their shared big scene.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Mark Caro

    The cinematic equivalent of Trix. It's just made to be enjoyed by certain folks more than others. Will girls like it? More than their parents.

    Read Full Review

  • 60

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    Cheerfully disconnected from the real world, bearing a great resemblance to screwball comedies of old.

    Read Full Review

  • See all New York Minute reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 10+

Not great, but Olsen twin fans won't care.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that there is some very mild language (a post-it saying "remove stick from butt" is about as rough as it gets) and violence. There is some booty-shaking, implied comic nudity, and skimpy clothing, but when the girls have to run around the city wearing a robe and a towel both are no-nonsense cover-ups. There are a couple of kisses and one of the girls has a boy fall on top of her. There is also some crude potty humor. Parents will be more concerned about the behavior in the movie, including lying, cutting school, cheating, stealing, forgery, reckless driving without a license, and accepting a ride from a stranger, all with very little by way of consequences. Audience members may also find the portrayal of minority characters to be uncomfortably stereotyped. The African-American characters are kind, wise, and generous but they express themselves in a manner that is exaggerated and caricature-ish even beyond what is allowable for a comedy. The villain is a Dragon Lady right out of the old "Terry and the Pirates" comic strip, and Andy Richter's henchman who thinks he's Chinese so speaks in pidgin English is just awful.

  • Families can talk about Shirl's comment that "It's the curveballs that make life interesting -- shows us what we're made of. And if we're lucky sometimes there's a miracle at the end of that wrong turn." How did the loss of the girls' mother make it harder for them to be close to each other? What was the most important thing that Jane and Roxy learned from each other? When do you have an opportunity to help someone the way that Trey, James, Shirl, and Mr. McGill help Jane and Roxy?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: Lying, cutting school, cheating, stealing, forgery, reckless driving without a license, and accepting a ride from a stranger, all with very little by way of consequences. Some stereotyping.

What to watch for
  • violence false0

    Violence: Comic peril, no one hurt.

  • sex false0

    Sex: A couple of kisses, implied comic nudity.

  • language false0

    Language: Not an issue

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false0

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Not an issue

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