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Mirror Mirror Review

Movies.com Critics

0.5

Dave White Profile

Poison Read full review

2.0

Grae Drake Profile

Reflects poorly. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    46

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 30

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter

    This is a movie drowning in flamboyant design elements and in need of a stiff shot of enchantment.

    Read Full Review

  • 58

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    A dull and unbewitching movie.

    Read Full Review

  • 63

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    Mirror Mirror is a sumptuous fantasy for the eyes and a pinball game for the mind, as story elements collide and roll around bumping into each other.

    Read Full Review

  • 75

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    Singh brings cheeky humor, an eccentric sensibility and an enchanting look to his re-imagined tale.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Mirror Mirror reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 8+

Visually appealing fairy tale lacks oomph but fine for kids.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Mirror Mirror is a kid-friendly take on the Snow White fairy tale. Expect a few (bloodless) sword fights and some suggestive jokes that may go over kids' head (including references to a "May-December" romance and a quick reference to being "taken advantage of"). There's also a chaste kiss, a few longing looks, and a couple of dog-like licks on the queen's face while the prince is under a spell. In addition to the sword fights, the Mirror casts some malicious spells, and there are two killer, giant marionettes that try to destroy Snow White and the dwarfs. Unlike Disney's Snow White, Lily Collins' princess ends up learning how to stand up for herself and fights the queen's (Julia Roberts) evil beast alongside the prince.

  • Families can talk about how this take on Snow White compares to other versions of the beloved fairy tale. In what ways is this Snow White more assertive than other representations of her? How are the dwarfs a bigger part of the story?
  • What does Mirror Mirror have to say about vanity? What are the literal and figurative costs of the queen's vanity? Should it matter if you're the most beautiful person around?
  • Why are princess tales so popular? Does this spin on the princess story have a more progressive message for girls than previous versions?

The good stuff
  • educationalvalue true2

    Educational value: This isn't an educational film, but there are some lessons in the importance of self confidence, tolerance, and generosity. The queen also teaches kids the dangers of greed and vanity.

  • message true3

    Messages: Prominent messages about the importance of selflessness, kindness, and not basing your assessment of someone on their looks or height or wealth. The evil queen (who's clearly a villainess) is portrayed as power-hungry, uncaring, narcissistic, and uninterested in anyone but herself, while Snow's journey shows young girls that they need to stand up for themselves and what's right, even if it's a scary thing to do.

  • rolemodels true2

    Role models: Snow White does eventually learn to stand up to the queen and fight for what's right, but she's a fairly passive character for most of the movie. The dwarfs are intelligent and skilled, but they've been forced to live in exile and steal from rich travelers. The prince is brave and confident, as princes tend to be in stories. On the other hand, the queen is unmitigatedly mean, resentful, and jealous.

What to watch for
  • violence false2

    Violence and scariness: Some sword fighting (no one is seriously injured) and a sequence in which two giant marionettes try to kill Snow White and destroy the dwarfs' home. Toward the end of the movie, the queen unleashes her pet beast (a flying mythical creature) which nearly kills Snow and the prince. The king dies in the beginning of the movie, but it's not shown. Some threats.

  • sex false2

    Sexy stuff: A few suggestive jokes. Half-Pint keeps flirting with Snow White, with whom he's clearly smitten. The queen makes several comments about how distractingly attractive the prince is, and Snow White and the prince share a kiss. In one scene, a bespelled prince licks the queen's face. The prince and Snow White have a sword fight in which he "spanks" her with his sword. The prince's shirt is stripped from him, and the queen reacts to his physique.

  • language false1

    Language: The most commonly uttered insult is "idiot," with a "stupid" and some euphemisms for "short" thrown in aimed at the dwarfs.

  • consumerism false1

    Consumerism: No product placements, but the movie does have tie-ins like a novelization and chapter book, apparel, and more.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false1

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Some drinking by grown-ups at parties and receptions. A dwarf behaves in a drunken manner.

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