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Man of the Year Review

Movies.com Critics

0.0

Dave White Profile

… it deserves to be hated. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 2.0
    39

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Generally unfavorable reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 40

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    The result is a mess -- sometimes an entertaining mess, but mostly a movie that makes a perfunctory mockery of the mockery currently passing for political discourse.

  • 42

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    Williams turns out to be exactly the wrong candidate for the job, a comedian singularly uninterested in letting anyone else get a word in, but with nothing to say.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    Like a politician who waters down his message to gain favor with the masses rather than truly serving his constituency, Man of the Year seems determined to play it safe on all counts.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    Levinson diverts his film into a political thriller with its own conspiracy theory, an improbable romance and a curious subplot that feels like an anti-smoking ad. Little wonder his bewildered star, Robin Williams, looks confused much of the time.

    Read Full Review

  • 63

    out of 100

    ReelViews James Berardinelli

    For 60 minutes, the movie appears to have found the right tone and approach, then everything goes wrong. It's rare to see a production that starts so strongly finish so weakly.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Man of the Year reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 12+

Lame political comedy misses the mark.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that teens will likely be interested in this movie thanks to relentless promotion and its connection to Daily Show host Jon Stewart. Unfortunately, it just isn't that funny -- it could have been an amusing political commentary, but it missed the mark. Also, there are crude jokes galore (remember, it stars Robin Williams) about diapers, farts, "inhaling," pictures of naked women, and sex ("I did not have sex with that woman ... I wanted to, but I didn't").

  • Families can talk about whether a comedian could really run for president and win. If so, who would be a good candidate? What makes someone qualified to be president? Is it OK to have a president who isn't exactly a model of morality? What specific people and issues is the movie spoofing? What issues should be brought up in a presidential candidacy? Where does your family stand on topical issues like abortion, hydrogen fuel, war, and legal marijuana?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: A character tries to cover up his company's mistake. Characters are corrupt (politicians, corporate big-wigs). Lots of crude humor.

What to watch for
  • violence false0

    Violence: Paint-ball scene in which the president is shot. A character refers to beating up a guy when he was a teenager.

  • sex false3

    Sex: Romance between two characters, kissing, implied sex, jokes about Monica Lewinsky, lesbians, foreplay, prostitutes, underwear, same-sex marriages, pictures of naked women.

  • language false3

    Language: "Damn," "f--k."

  • consumerism false3

    Consumerism: Post-It Notes, Paintball, references to Enron, Jon Stewart, Bill Maher, Oprah, Saturday Night Live, NASCAR, Ikea.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: A character chain smokes. Social drinking at a dinner party. Jokes about "inhaling."

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