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The Majestic Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 2.0
    27

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Generally unfavorable reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 10

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    The worst would-be-big-and-Capraesque-but-actually-bloated-and-bloviating-beyond-belief movie of the year.

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    A pale imitation that challenges credulity and tries too hard to win our hearts with schmaltz.

    Read Full Review

  • 58

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    Maybe this well-loved Luke is who his neighbors want him to be, a good fellow who, with his father, reopens the old movie house in town -- the Majestic -- thus allowing his neighbors to dream in the dark again.

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  • 63

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Michael Wilmington

    A real sentimental journey -- and luckily they've got both the right director (Darabont) and the right actor to squeeze our heartstrings.

  • 88

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    It tells a full story with three acts, it introduces characters we get to know and care about, and it has something it passionately wants to say.

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  • See all The Majestic reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 11+

This corny movie may not appeal to kids.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this movie has brief strong and vulgar language, mild sexual references, a scary accident, and a sad on-screen death. Many characters are mourning sons killed in the war. One returning soldier is disabled and bitter. Pete responds to bad news by getting drunk and he drives while he is drunk.

  • Families can talk about the Red Scare of the 1950's that blacklisted many Hollywood writers and performers. As recently as 1999, when distinguished director Elia Kazan received a special Oscar, there were protests because he cooperated with the House Committee, as Pete is urged to do here. Some of those called to testify refused to cooperate. What were the different pressures that Pete had to reconcile? What were the priorities that made him decide what he did? How did his ideas about himself change? Why?

What to watch for
  • violence false2

    Violence: Car accident, reference to young men killed in war, sad death.

  • sex false2

    Sex: Mild for PG-13

  • language false3

    Language: Brief strong and vulgar language

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Character responds to bad news by getting drunk.

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