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Love and Honor Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 2.0
    28

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Generally unfavorable reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 20

    out of 100

    Village Voice Nick Schager

    Between the cast's modern hairstyles and attitude, and the paint-by-numbers set design and period costumes...the action comes across as a prolonged, dreary game of dress-up. That director Danny Mooney shoots his material like a TV show doesn't help.

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  • 20

    out of 100

    The New York Times Nicolas Rapold

    The film dresses up pretty young things in fatigues and retro T-shirts for a story so clichéd and brainless that it’s almost more disturbing than laughable.

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  • 60

    out of 100

    Los Angeles Times Gary Goldstein

    Save a weak police pursuit, events are earnestly depicted and involvingly played, even if the period re-creation at times feels overly burnished. Still, Love and Honor suffices as old-fashioned, pie-in-the-sky entertainment.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Love and Honor reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 14+

Inauthentic Vietnam-era romance feels like a TV movie.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that teen fans of The Hunger Games co-star Liam Hemsworth may well want to see Love and Honor -- but know that it has a fair bit of drug use, sexuality, and violence. Considering the '60s setting, the drug use (marijuana) isn't that unexpected; nor is the tension between protesters and police and the shooting in the movie's brief war scene. There are two love scenes (bare-chested men and bra-wearing women) and a few passionate kisses. Teens will at the very least learn, if they haven't already, about the opposition to the Vietnam War.

  • Families can talk about whether movies set during the Vietnam era are still relevant. Why is it rare to see movies about Vietnam now when they were so popular in the '80s and '90s? Is there a modern equivalent?
  • Does Love and Honor have more to do with the war or with the characters' romantic relationships? What did you learn about the Vietnam War?
  • Teens: Is there a cause you feel passionately about that you could help? How could you get involved?

The good stuff
  • message true3

    Messages: The movie promotes standing up for what you believe in and making sure your voice is heard. It also stresses the importance of honesty in romantic relationships.

  • rolemodels true2

    Role models: Candace opposes the war but is willing to support the soldiers. Mickey realizes he was wrong to lie about his and Dalton's intentions and wins over Candace by telling the truth instead of lying when it suits him. Dalton and Janie maturely realize that they love each other -- but that it's not enough to save their relationship.

What to watch for
  • violence false3

    Violence: The opening sequence takes place in Vietnam, and there are a couple of close calls, but only one character is actually shot and injured. Mickey discusses some of his fellow soldiers who've died in battle, and Dalton hits a pacifist who was kissing his fiancee. Police roughly arrest protesters, and two friends find out that another friend in Vietnam has died.

  • sex false3

    Sex: Two love scenes show bare-chested men and women who are either wearing a bra or have a sheet or blanket covering them up. A couple of passionate kisses -- one that's scandalous because it's obvious the young woman doesn't believe in monogamy (she had just gotten engaged to someone else).

  • language false3

    Language: A few uses of "s--t, " "a--hole," and "bitch."

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: College-age students and soldiers smoke marijuana (a few times) and get drunk and/or drink heavily -- in keeping with the reputation for open drug use among young people in the '60s.

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