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Letters to Juliet Review

Movies.com Critics

2.5

Dave White Profile

He's on a horse. Read full review

1.0

Jen Yamato Profile

A bad, bland romance. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    50

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 30

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    (It doesn't hurt that Ms. Redgrave gets to play opposite Franco Nero, who was once the love of her life and is the father of her son.) Not even she can transform lines like "Destiny wanted us to meet again."

    Read Full Review

  • 40

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter

    Bland, predictable picture, whose sole assets are a cute premise, the Italian countryside and the dignity Vanessa Redgrave brings to a part that, on the page, is quite beneath her.

    Read Full Review

  • 63

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    It's a chick flick with a likable premise.

    Read Full Review

  • 83

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    Redgrave shimmers like one of Tuscany's magnificent cypress trees as an Englishwoman searching for Lorenzo (Nero).

    Read Full Review

  • See all Letters to Juliet reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 11+

Super swoony romantic fluff that's fun for tweens.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this romantic drama is an inoffensive, light and fluffy romance for tweens and teens. There is very little to object to -- just a couple of kisses, witty, flirtatious banter, and some tame references to romance, love, and love-making. Language wise, there's one "s--t" but that's about it, except for British words like "blasted" and "bollocks," as well some grown-ups enjoying a glass of wine or champagne in social situations. The messages center around distinguishing true everlasting love, which the movie claims will never die. The protagonist, a young journalist, is encouraged to take a risk with her career, but it takes a guy (and an elderly lady's long-lost love) to convince her to believe in herself.

  • Families can talk about the movie's overall message about about first love? Do you think teenagers often feel like their love stories will last the test of time? What's the reality?
  • What is the difference between Sophie's relationship with Victor and her relationship with Charlie? How is one shown as preferential to the other?
  • Sophie says her perfectionism keeps her from finishing her stories. What's different about the "Letters to Juliet" story? What helps Sophie muster up the courage to submit her work? Do you think this movie portrays Sophie as powerful on her own, or dependant on others? Is this typical of romantic movies?

The good stuff
  • message true1

    Messages: There's a sweet, but not altogether reasonable message that first love never dies, no matter how many years have passed. A smart young fact-checker summons her courage to become the journalist she's always wanted to be (though it takes a guy's urging to make this happen).

  • rolemodels true1

    Role models: Sophie trusts in her abilities as a journalist, writes and submits her story, even though there was a risk it wouldn't get published.

What to watch for
  • violence false0

    Violence: Not an issue

  • sex false2

    Sex:  A couple of kisses, some flirting and a few tame references to romance and married couples who "make passionate love."

  • language false2

    Language: British curses like "blasted," "bollocks," "bleeding," and the like; mild insults such as "idiot," "ass," "jerk," and one "s--t." Plus a couple "oh my God"s as exclamations.

  • consumerism false1

    Consumerism: Sophie works at The New Yorker magazine, which is referenced many times throughout the movie. A rental Audi convertible's logo is shown in close-up.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false1

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Adults drink wine or champagne at dinners, in vineyards and, at a wedding reception.

Fan Reviews provided by

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by Meganpaige21

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