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Jack and Jill Review

Movies.com Critics

1.0

Dave White Profile

Adam Sandler's Madea's Hanukkah Miracle Read full review

0.5

Grae Drake Profile

This needs to be burned. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 2.0
    23

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Generally unfavorable reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 12

    out of 100

    USA Today Scott Bowles

    A comedy that has one good joke, four strange cameos and a spirit so juvenile kids may wonder what Sandler's deal is.

    Read Full Review

  • 20

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter

    Jack and Jill is witless and sloppily constructed, getting by on fart gags, homeless jokes, Latino stereotypes and that old favorite, explosive chimichanga diarrhea -- and no, not in an inspired "Bridesmaids" way.

    Read Full Review

  • 33

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    In one form or another, you get exactly what you pay for at an Adam Sandler comedy. Otherwise the man wouldn't have earned zillions.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Michael Phillips

    It's not much to hijack. But playing a lovelorn version of himself, in love with Adam Sandler in a dress, a lisp and breasts, Al Pacino holds a gun to the head of the comedy Jack and Jill and says: I now pronounce you mine.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Jack and Jill reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 9+

Few laughs in crude, kid-targeted Sandler comedy.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that, like all Adam Sandler movies aimed at families, Jack and Jill includes lots of potty humor and crude jokes at the expense of women who don't fit the Hollywood ideal of beauty. Since Sandler plays both Jack and his twin sister, Jill, the movie "allows" him to make many jokes about women's bodies and personalities -- not to mention bodily functions. There's also plenty of insult language ("freak," "stupid," "loser," etc.), some suggestive comments/humor, and an extended sequence featuring a stereotypical Mexican family that may offend some viewers. Parents concerned with commercialism should note that the comedy is chock-full of product placements, from Sony (which is also the movie's distributor) to Dunkin Donuts and many, many more.

  • Families can talk about why Adam Sandler's movies are so popular. Are fart jokes and gags about people's appearance that funny? What's the difference between his "family" movies and the ones for older audiences?
  • How does Jack and Jill portray women? What message is it sending about appearance and body image?
  • Does the movie undermine or reinforce stereotypes? When does portraying an ethnic group shift from comedy to insulting?
  • Do you think that all of the companies and products featured in the movie are necessary to the plot? If not, why are they included?

The good stuff
  • message true1

    Messages: Although Jack and Jill's positive message is overshadowed by the many gross-out gags and fart jokes -- not to mention the many jokes made at others' expense (especially women who don't fit the "accepted" standard of beauty) -- there are some take-aways about the importance of family, friendship, and not taking your siblings for granted.

  • rolemodels true1

    Role models: Jill, despite her obnoxious personality, is a loving sister and aunt, and she manages to be optimistic despite all the disappointments she faces. Jack realizes how important his twin sister is to him, even though she annoys him. On the downside, women who don't fit a certain standard of beauty are the butt of jokes, and there are some stereotypical depictions of a Mexican family.

What to watch for
  • violence false1

    Violence: Slapstick and physical comedy throughout: Jack's son punches his Aunt Jill, and she falls off her chair. Jack, disguised as Jill, shoves and hits Al Pacino, and he retaliates. Jill punches a bathroom attendant, who goes flying through a bathroom door.

  • sex false2

    Sex: Pacino makes lots of suggestive overtures toward Jill, and Felipe also flirts with her. Jill's full-figure bras and control-top panties are shown on more than one occasion for laughs. Jack and his wife hug and are shown in bed together, but they're just getting ready to sleep.

  • language false2

    Language: "Hell," "crap," "oh my God," and insults ranging from "freak" and "annoying" to "loser" and "stupid." Jill, who's rather sheltered, makes tactless comments (she wonders if a bearded man is Al Qaeda, etc.).

  • consumerism false5

    Consumerism: Like many of Sandler's movies, there are nonstop product placements and corporate tie-ins. The sequence on the cruise feels like an extended commercial for Royal Caribbean and its ship. Everyone uses Sony computers (Sony is also distributing the film); Pepto and Dunkin Donuts aren't just prominently featured -- the companies are Jack's clients, and fake commercials the brands are shown in the movie. Other tie-ins include The Price Is Right, YouTube, Craigslist, Morton's Steakhouse, online dating sites like Match.com and eHarmony, and celebrity cameos.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false1

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Adults are shown at dinner parties with wine or champagne on the table, but it's not overt.

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