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The Invisible Woman Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 4.0
    75

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Generally favorable reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 100

    out of 100

    Variety Scott Foundas

    So tastefully mounted and brilliantly acted that it wears down even the corset-phobic’s innate resistance to such things.

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  • 100

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Todd McCarthy

    A career high point for Ralph Fiennes as both an actor and director, this unfussy and emotionally penetrating work also provides lead actress Felicity Jones with the prime role in which she abundantly fulfills the promise suggested in some of her earlier small films.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    ReelViews James Berardinelli

    One of the singular pleasures of films like The Invisible Woman is the window they offer into the lives of deceased authors who are known primarily to modern audiences only through the words they committed to paper.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Richard Roeper

    Felicity Jones gives a fierce and moving performance as Nelly.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Michael Phillips

    Even if you don't entirely buy this version of events, director Ralph Fiennes has given us a speculation that works as drama. It's an elegant bit of goods.

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  • 80

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    The Invisible Woman gives us a plausible image of the great man in the fullness of his celebrity, and an affecting portrait of the woman who lived much of her life in his shadow.

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  • 88

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    A meticulously rendered, tasteful and moving period drama.

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  • See all The Invisible Woman reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Pause for kids 15 & under

Dickens love story with a bit of sex and a disturbing image.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that The Invisible Woman tells the story of Charles Dickens and his love affair with a woman he was forced to keep secret. There's a disturbing shot of a dead bloody baby following a miscarriage, plus a train crash and a bloody head wound. Two sex scenes are shown, but are mainly suggested by moaning and heavy breathing rather than any nudity or sexual images. A woman is briefly seen naked from behind, and there's a scene in an alleyway with prostitutes who say "a shilling a blow." Unfortunately, even teens who are interested in Dickens will probably get very little out of this superbly designed, but tepid movie.

  • Families can talk about relationships and marriage. How have the rules and traditions of marriage changed since the time depicted in this movie? How would this movie's story have been different if it happened today?
  • The movie contains some disturbing scenes of violence. Were these scenes necessary? How did they affect the overall movie?
  • How much did you know about Charles Dickens going in? What did you learn? Does the movie make you want to read more about him? Or read his books?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: A famous author separates from his wife to take a younger lover, but he's unable to make his relationship public; he must lie about it. This seems like more of an issue of the times (the mid-19th century) than due to the relationship itself, so viewers may be left wondering what the big deal was.

  • rolemodels true0

    Role models: Charles Dickens might be a literary role model, but this movie spends more time on his relationship troubles than on his writing. Nelly Ternan seems highly intelligent, but she is trapped and defined by the love of a powerful man.

What to watch for
  • violence false2

    Violence: After a main character has a miscarriage, there's a disturbing shot of the dead baby, covered in blood. He's wrapped up and carried away, but Dickens stops to take a clipping of the baby's hair. We experience a train crash from inside the train, and then we see the wreckage from outside. A main character is shown with blood on her forehead.

  • sex false3

    Sex: In the prologue (1883, after Dickens' death), Nelly is shown having sex with her current husband; she moans with pleasure, but there's no nudity. In one scene, Dickens walks in on his wife dressing. Her naked bottom is shown, but she covers herself up when she turns to face him. Later, Dickens and Nelly are shown having sex, but it's really only a shot of their faces and some subtle body movements and heavy breathing. A scene takes place in a London alleyway, where prostitutes are working. One offers "a shilling a blow."

  • language false0

    Language: Not applicable

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not applicable

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false0

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Characters sometimes drink socially (champagne, etc.).

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