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Ida Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 5.0
    89

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Universal acclaim
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 100

    out of 100

    The New York Times A.O. Scott

    There is an implicit argument here between faith and materialism, one that is resolved with wit, conviction and generosity of spirit. Mr. Pawlikowski has made one of the finest European films (and one of most insightful films about Europe, past and present) in recent memory.

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  • 100

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Bill Stamets

    Ida reaches spiritual depth through affecting performances rendered in sublime black-and-white compositions.

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  • 100

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    Pawel Pawlikowski's Ida, a compact masterpiece set in Poland in the early 1960s, gets to the heart of its matter with startling swiftness.

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  • 100

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Michael Phillips

    One of the year's gems.

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  • 100

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Todd McCarthy

    Frame by frame, Ida looks resplendently bleak, its stunning monochromes combining with the inevitable gloomy Polish weather and communist-era deprivations to create a harsh, unforgiving environment.

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  • 60

    out of 100

    Variety Peter Debruge

    It’s one thing to set up a striking black-and-white composition and quite another to draw people into it, and dialing things back as much as this film does risks losing the vast majority of viewers along the way, offering an intellectual exercise in lieu of an emotional experience to all but the most rarefied cineastes.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Chris Nashawaty

    With her brassy, determined aunt, Ida sets off to find answers and discovers life beyond the convent walls in this leisurely but satisfying journey.

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  • 90

    out of 100

    Village Voice

    Ida unfolds partly as chamber play and partly as road movie, following the two women on a search for their dead beloveds' anonymous graves.

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  • See all Ida reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 14+

Intense drama, unforgettable story of post-Holocaust Poland.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Ida is a 2013 Polish film about a young orphan woman raised in a convent on the verge of becoming a nun before learning that she is Jewish. She undergoes a journey in search of her background, and where her parents, killed during the Holocaust, are buried. As such, it's an emotionally intense drama best for teens who have the maturity and historical perspective to understand not only what transpired during the Nazi occupation of Poland in the 1940s but also what life was like in Poland under Communist rule in the early 1960s. One of the lead characters frequently drinks and smokes; she drives around the Polish countryside drinking vodka straight from the bottle, culminating in a car accident after which she is arrested for drunk driving. There also is brief nudity (bare breasts) in the aftermath of two characters having sex. A character is shown jumping out of an apartment window to commit suicide, which is filmed from behind.

  • Families can talk about films in which the Holocaust is a major theme. Although the film is set nearly 20 years after World War II, how does the Holocaust haunt these characters?
  • Why do you think the filmmakers chose to make this movie in black and white? What effect does this decision have on the overall story?
  • How are the realities of daily life in early 1960s Poland conveyed in the movie?
  • How can you learn more about the Holocaust?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: Not much in the way of positive messages in this one.

  • rolemodels true0

    Role models: Ida must confront horrible realities about the fates of her parents during World War II in Poland, and the knowledge of her heritage forces her to reassess her intentions of becoming a nun.

What to watch for
  • violence false2

    Violence: A woman commits suicide by jumping out of a window in her apartment; the scene is filmed from inside the apartment.

  • sex false3

    Sex: A woman's bare breasts. A man and a woman are naked in bed after sex.

  • language false2

    Language: "S--t."

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not applicable

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: A woman drinks from a bottle of vodka before operating a vehicle. She loses control of the vehicle and is arrested for drunk driving. Characters drink and smoke.

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