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Happy Feet Two Review

Movies.com Critics

3.5

Dave White Profile

What just happened? Read full review

2.0

Grae Drake Profile

Absolutely krilliant. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    50

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Staff [Not Credited]

    For a computer-animated movie about dancing penguins, it's surprisingly leaden. Not even the impressive voice talent can rev up this clumsy spectacle.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Todd McCarthy

    Even with the addition of new characters, such as the ones voiced by Brad Pitt and Matt Damon, George Miller's animated sequel just isn't very funny.

    Read Full Review

  • 63

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    For me, Happy Feet Two is pretty thin soup. The animation is bright and attractive, the music gives the characters something to do, but the movie has too much dialogue in the areas of philosophy and analysis.

    Read Full Review

  • 91

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    Earnest messages about bad climate change and good parenting skills have been replaced by a we-all-share-a-planet sense of fun that's more "Finding Nemo" than National Geographic.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Happy Feet Two reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 5+

Penguin sequel has fun musical numbers, a few mild scares.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this sequel to 2006's Academy Award-winning animated adventure Happy Feet features many of the same environmental and family lessons for audiences. Global warming's impact on the penguin characters is again addressed; the peril that comes with natural disasters may frighten the youngest of viewers -- as could some scenes with large/menacing elephant seals and predatory skua birds. There are also a few mild innuendos from the penguin voiced by Robin Williams, and some viewers may interpret the relationship between two male krill as having gay undertones, particularly when Bill suggests they start a swarm of their own. But ultimately this is a tale of family, friendship, and what it means to find your individual voice -- your own special gift.

  • Families can talk about the movie's messages about independence and environmental awareness. How do Will the Krill and little Eric struggle with the same sort of issues? How do they each achieve their goal of uniqueness?
  • Why do some people think that everyone should conform and "fit in"? Has there ever been a time when you didn't feel like you fit in? How did that make you feel?
  • How does the sequel compare to the original? What are some similarities between Mumble's journey and Eric's? Which movie do you prefer?

The good stuff
  • educationalvalue true2

    Educational value: Kids are likely to pick up on the movie's environmental message about the dangers of global warming, as well as the importance of finding your own voice and encouraging your family and friends.

  • message true3

    Messages: Like the original, the sequel features a strong environmental message and also encourages parents to let their children believe in possibilities and follow their passions. Kids will also learn the importance of helping others and how every individual can make a huge impact.

  • rolemodels true3

    Role models: Mumble and Gloria are kind, encouraging parents who want Eric to live up to his potential. Eric himself is sweet and believes in others, even though he's not confident at first about his own abilities. A mama penguin thinks of obstacles as challenges to overcome, so her daughter is a fearless young penguin. Bill and Will each go on their own journeys of self discovery that eventually lead them both "home."

What to watch for
  • violence false2

    Violence and scariness: An iceberg traps the penguins in a snow valley that they can't climb out of, and a couple of times the situation looks dire for them. The krill are eaten by whales and other fish, so Will and Bill realize that they're at the bottom of the food chain. A huge elephant seal looks poised to harm Mumble, Eric, and their pals but then falls off a cliff and requires assistance. Two male seals battle for dominance. The predatory skuas try to peck at the penguin chicks.

  • sex false1

    Sexy stuff: Penguin mates Mumble and Gloria embrace. Ramon is smitten with the beautiful Adelie penguin Carmen and calls out to her "You, me, egg, now!" in a suggestive way. They flirt throughout the movie.

  • language false1

    Language: Insults/language like "loser," "idiots," "sucks," and "bottom feeders."

  • consumerism false2

    Consumerism: Nothing in the actual movie, but merchandise tie-ins are available in stores.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false0

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Not an issue

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