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Happy Endings Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    57

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 50

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Lisa Schwarzbaum

    There are pleasing outcomes for almost everyone in Happy Endings, and that's not good news.

    Read Full Review

  • 63

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    Maintains a certain level of intrigue, and occasionally bursts into life.

    Read Full Review

  • 70

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    A real audience pleaser, so long as that audience is mentally agile and adult, for it comes at you from odd angles and features three distinct story lines and 10 main characters.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    The film is entertaining if contrived. It is not as cleverly structured as Roos' best ensemble comedy, "The Opposite of Sex," which also co-starred Kudrow. But it does have humorous moments.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Happy Endings reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

not for kids

Very mature relationship comedy isn't for kids.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this movie includes sexual language and situations (one discreet insinuation of masturbation), drinking, smoking, and some drug use. It features a violent start (a woman is hit by a car), frank discussions of abortion and artificial insemination, as well as characters' lies regarding parentage, sexual orientation, background (for instance, illegal immigration and marriage), and ambitions. Themes are designed for mature viewers, though difficult ideas are here turned into comedy (some of this is bittersweet).

  • Families can talk about this movie's complex relationships between parents and children. Why might Mamie be worried about meeting her son, whom she gave up for adoption 20 years ago? How does Otis' fear of his father's reaction to his homosexuality lead to his flawed decisions? And how does Charley's anxiety concerning Gil's potential fatherhood lead him to jump to conclusions? How does the movie make the case for open communications, as a way to avoid tension and distrust?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: Characters lie and worry about lying.

What to watch for
  • violence false3

    Violence: A car accident.

  • sex false5

    Sex: Sexual activity and discussions (abortion, homosexuality, masturbation).

  • language false3

    Language: Strong, in intimate use -- conversations and arguments.

  • consumerism false3

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Drinking, smoking, some drug use.

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