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Casino Royale Review

Movies.com Critics

4.5

Dave White Profile

It makes actual sense. Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 5.0
    81

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Universal acclaim
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 100

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Owen Gleiberman

    Relaunches the series by doing something I wouldn't have thought possible: It turns Bond into a human being again -- a gruffly charming yet volatile chap who may be the swank king stud of the Western world, but who still has room for rage, fear, vulnerability, love.

    Read Full Review

  • 100

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    This movie is NEW from the get-go. It could be your first Bond. In fact, it was the first Bond; it was Ian Fleming's first 007 novel, and he was still discovering who the character was.

    Read Full Review

  • 75

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    The film is about a half hour too long. The third act drags and an extended high-stakes poker game doesn't always keep our attention. But this is a superior Bond.

    Read Full Review

  • 80

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    Daniel Craig isn't merely acceptable, but formidable. His Bond is at least the equal of the best ones before him, and beats all of them in sheer intensity.

  • 80

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    What a relief to escape the series' increasing bondage to high-tech gimmicks in favor of intrigue and suspense featuring richly nuanced characters and women who think the body's sexiest organ is the brain.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Casino Royale reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 13+

Darker than usual Bond; too violent for tweens.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that teens are absolutely going to want to see this much-hyped re-start to the James Bond franchise. The new 007, however, is darker than previous incarnations. His sly, barely perceptible smile suggests that he relishes revenge and takes pleasure in his violence. The film is full of violence, including spectacular explosions, intense physical fights, shooting, knifing, cars crashing, and drowning. Dead bodies show blood and vacant-eyed faces. A torture scene (featuring a naked Bond) shows him in obvious pain as his genitals are smashed with a large, knotted rope. One main character meets a sad demise. Sex scenes show Bond with two different women, in various states of undress. Lots of martini-drinking as Bond discovers his drink of choice (thanks to liquor sponsors Heineken and Smirnoff). The language is pretty mild.

  • Families can talk about what makes Bond so appealing. What does his behavior say about images of manliness?
  • How does the movie characterize this new Bond as both ruthless and charismatic? Who's your favorite Bond?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: Villains are ruthlessly efficient and lethal in pursuit of money and power; Bond is also brutal, darkly pleased to best his opponents.

  • rolemodels true0

    Role models: James Bond in this film is played darker than in previous versions. He is angry, determined, and often motivated by revenge. Bond's position as a cultural icon is well known, but this version is considerably more gritty, and that means there is less to look up to in Bond. 

What to watch for
  • violence false4

    Violence: Lots of stunts, per usual in Bond movies: animated opening credits sequence features shooting, stabbing, and falling, with bright red splotches for blood; film includes explosions by bombs, grenades, and missiles; car chases and flips; leaps on and off building scaffolding; corpse wrapped in a hammock; Bond's face and body are cut and bleeding repeatedly; bloody results from frequent shooting, knifing, and punching; poisoned, Bond sweats and gasps, nearly dying; a long, sad drowning sequence; fight scenes feature kicking, punching, falling/throwing bodies down stairs; one villain wields a sword; Bond is tortured by a villain whomping his genitals with a knotted rope.

  • sex false3

    Sex: Bond beds two different women (all three characters show nude legs and arms while kissing and embracing passionately on beds and floors); Bond is naked for a torture session (you see everything but full frontal); joke about an undercover name for Vesper ("Miss Stephanie Broadchest").

  • language false0

    Language: Mild language, including "Jesus Christ," repeated use of "hell" by M (i.e., "What the hell is Bond doing!?"), and "ass."

  • consumerism false3

    Consumerism: The usual upscale Bond paraphernalia: Liquor tie-ins include Heineken and Smirnoff Vodka, goodies include Aston Martin, Jaguar, Sony Vaio, Sony Ericsson, Omega watch, Bodyworld Museum exhibit; Virgin Atlantic airline (including airport cameo by owner Richard Branson); Coca-Cola.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Much drinking (champagne, martinis, brandy, Scotch) and oh yes, those liquor sponsored placements...)

Fan Reviews provided by

5

by Super-Huro

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