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Brother Bear Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    48

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 50

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly

    Mark it: Phil Collins officially has nothing more to teach us. The tunes he's composed for Brother Bear are so generic, they're modular.

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  • 50

    out of 100

    Chicago Tribune Mark Caro

    There's something vanilla about the whole enterprise, from the one-size-fits-all spiritualism to Phil Collins' generic world-music songs.

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  • 70

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    A playful movie that celebrates nature and the spirit world with striking imagery and a smooth blend of drama and comedy.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    USA Today Staff [Not Credited]

    A sweet celebration of brotherhood in its many forms. It gently encourages human communion with animals, nature and our fellow man.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    ReelViews James Berardinelli

    The end result is a pleasant experience that is more appropriate for families than for adults unaccompanied by young offspring.

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  • 75

    out of 100

    Chicago Sun-Times Roger Ebert

    Sweet rather than exciting.

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  • See all Brother Bear reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 5+

Lackluster story only for kindergarteners.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that the movie has some tense scenes of peril, and two characters are killed. Some children may be disturbed by the way that those characters return as spirits, but some may be reassured that love never dies. There is a little potty humor. The movie's multicultural range of voices and setting in pre-historic Inuit culture add a lot to the movie's texture.

  • Families can talk about which totems they would like to pick for themselves and what animals they would most like to get a chance to be. What did Kenai learn as a bear that he could not learn as a human? There is an old Native American saying that you should not judge another person until you have walked a mile in his moccasins. How does this movie make handle that idea? What do you think about his decision at the end of the movie? Talk about the movie's perspective on what you do to make amends when you have done something terrible, and about how siblings should support each other. Be sure that children notice how the look of the movie changes when Kenai becomes a bear. As Kenai sees through a bear's eyes, we see through his, the entire shape of the screen changing and the colors brightening. As Kenai also learns to listen, the sound of the movie becomes fuller as well.

What to watch for
  • violence false3

    Violence and scariness: Characters killed. Characters in peril.

  • sex false0

    Sexy stuff: Not an issue

  • language false0

    Language: Not an issue

  • consumerism false0

    Consumerism: Not an issue

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false0

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Not an issue

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