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Bee Movie Review

Movies.com Critics

2.0

Dave White Profile

… pretty dull … Read full review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    54

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 20

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    Bee Movie isn't a B movie, it's a Z movie, as in dizmal.

    Read Full Review

  • 38

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    It's so unfunny it almost stings.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Kirk Honeycutt

    Unfortunately, bees just aren't that funny...Nor is the odd story Seinfeld and his collaborators dreamed up very inspired.

    Read Full Review

  • 91

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Owen Gleiberman

    Agreeably skewed fun.

    Read Full Review

  • See all Bee Movie reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

OK for kids 5+

Seinfeld comedy is cute fun for the whole family.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that this has been one of the most aggressively marketed animated movies in recent history. Jerry Seinfeld has left no promotional stone unturned, so chances are that if you've had NBC on in the house for more than 20 minutes, your kids have seen a commercial for this movie. The good news is that it's a film that even preschoolers can follow, and while there are a few tense moments (mostly involving Barry's pell-mell flights through Manhattan), there are no overarching villains or monsters -- or even that many pop-culture references to frighten or confuse kids. There are still a few jokes that will go over little heads, but they're mostly about things like being "Beeish" (the insect equivalent of being Jewish), Larry King, and the boredom of working too hard. Oh, and a mosquito makes a blood-sucking lawyer joke.

  • Families can talk about what made kids want to see this movie -- the story or all the ads and product tie-ins. Was it "buzzworthy" of all the marketing hype? What parts of the movie are intended to appeal to kids, and which ones are meant for adults? How can you tell? Families can also discuss why the bees, particularly Barry, wanted their honey returned. Kids: What were the consequences of this? What did you learn about bees and nature? Does honey seem more important now than before you saw the film?

The good stuff
  • message true3

    Messages: The bees at first rally together to reclaim their own honey but later realize their pivotal role in keeping the environment beautiful. Barry initially blows off his responsibilities in the hive but learns how important even the smallest job can be. Vanessa sticks up for Barry (before she even knows he can talk) and saves him from getting squashed, asserting the value of every creature's life. Ken behaves very childishly, but it's all played for laughs.

What to watch for
  • violence false0

    Violence and scariness: Barry imagines Vanessa crashing and blowing up. He also has a terrifying flight across Manhattan in which he's almost killed several times. Bugs on a windshield are wiped away for good (some already dead, some still alive). Bees in a honey farm are gassed with smoke by beekeepers.

  • sex false0

    Sexy stuff: Barry daydreams about Vanessa; he and Vanessa spend a lot of time together, but they never have more than an interspecies friendship. Some mild innuendo that kids likely won't get (an older bee male talking about the time he dated a cricket, for example). Some jokes based on the idea of interspecies dating.

  • language false0

    Language: Mild: a mosquito makes a lawyer joke about blood-sucking parasites.

  • consumerism false3

    Consumerism: New York Post, Daily Variety, Timberland boots are all mentioned/featured. Lots of brand-name honey is featured, but all of the brands are fictional.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: A passerby's unpleasant cigarette smoke inspires Barry's defense in his legal case. Billowing smoke from beekeepers' smoke guns.

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