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50 First Dates Review

Other Critics provided by Metacritic.com

Critics scores range from 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating more favorable reviews.

  • 3.0
    48

    out of 100

    Metascore®
    Mixed or average reviews
    based on a weighted average of all
    critic review scores.

  • 20

    out of 100

    Wall Street Journal Joe Morgenstern

    Adam Sandler's 50 First Dates isn't just slovenly and smarmy but creepy.

  • 50

    out of 100

    USA Today Claudia Puig

    50 First Dates is working awfully hard to be romantic and not hard enough to be a comedy.

    Read Full Review

  • 50

    out of 100

    The Hollywood Reporter Sheri Linden

    Although its goofy high-concept premise won't bear much scrutiny, it offers a less predictable ride than their first pairing, and lush Hawaiian locations to boot.

    Read Full Review

  • 75

    out of 100

    Entertainment Weekly Owen Gleiberman

    As a comedy, 50 First Dates is standard Sandler, but as a love story it left me pleasantly buzzed, if not quite punch-drunk.

    Read Full Review

  • See all 50 First Dates reviews at Metacritic.com

For Families provided by Common Sense Media

Iffy for 13+

Silly, crude humor and a dash of romance.

What Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that some of the male characters in this movie don't treat women with respect. They lie to get into bed with women, and talk badly about their wives. True to form, there are numerous sexual references along with some lewd language. But the leading bad- boy in the movie does an about-face by becoming a loving, devoted boyfriend to a woman with a disability.

  • Families can talk about the tape Henry makes for Lucy. If you had to make a similar tape of your family, what would you put on it?
  • When is it OK to laugh about a disability and when is it not? Were there any jokes that crossed the line? Can you think of movies that have crossed the line?

The good stuff
  • message true0

    Messages: Though Henry starts out as a guy who lies to women he has one-night-stands with in order to keep himself unattached, he ends up being devoted to Lucy. In fact, he becomes so devoted that he helps her to overcome her disability. This is a comedy with some lewd and gross moments, as well as comedic portrayal of people with disabilities, but there is heart that beats beneath the surface.

  • rolemodels true2

    Role models: Henry definitely starts out as the poster boy for bad behavior, but he shapes up into a stand-up guy by the end of the movie. Lucy is a model of compassionate and kind behavior. Henry does use knowledge of Lucy's soft side to his advantage, but she knows how to stand up for herself -- she even protects herself by wielding sports equipment when she needs to.

What to watch for
  • violence false2

    Violence: Slapstick violence includes a character being beaten with a baseball bat by a woman (but he's not injured). Lucy is in a car accident and suffers from memory loss, which is a sadness that affects her family daily. A mention that Lucy's mother is deceased.

  • sex false3

    Sex: From the start, we learn that Henry dates and has sex with many women. References to these escapades include comments like, "He pounded me like a mallard duck." Though crude references and gestures are made, there are no naked images. Some kissing and feeling up.

  • language false3

    Language: Offhanded cursing, though pretty frequent: "s--t," "t-ty dance," "ass," "asshole," "balls," "bastard," "bitch," "boob," "booty," "butt," "damn," "dammit," "Goddammit," "hell," "jerk," "piss," "pissed," "crap," "slut," "nympho." Rude gestures like the middle finger show up a number of times too.

  • consumerism false3

    Consumerism: Reese's Peanut Butter Cups and Spam get a strong send-up.

  • drugsalcoholtobacco false3

    Drinking, drugs and smoking: Numerous references to smoking weed, including a scene where Ula is smoking pot and one where he is eating a pot brownie and feeding it to a dolphin. Characters drink beers or hard alcohol in almost every night-time scene. A woman drinks so that she will lose her inhibitions and have sex with Henry (he stops her). Lucy's brother admits to taking steroids.

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