What They Said: Bobcat Goldthwait Makes Diablo Cody Sad and Lars von Trier Isn't Sorry About Nazis

What They Said: Bobcat Goldthwait Makes Diablo Cody Sad and Lars von Trier Isn't Sorry About Nazis

Sep 21, 2011

 

 
Diablo Cody is finding herself at the center of someone's diatribe again, and this time the words sting. Actor, director, writer, and comedian Bobcat Goldthwait – someone the Juno writer admires greatly – has aimed a rant right at Cody in his new film God Bless America (read our review here). The film opened at the Toronto International Film Festival and was picked up for distribution by Magnolia Pictures. It's a dark piece of social commentary that targets everything and anything in pop culture, from television to … Diablo Cody.
 
The Jennifer's Body screenwriter – who is currently working on the screenplay for Young Adult and The Evil Dead remake – responded to the "sad" comments on her blog. " … I don’t even consider myself a part of “pop culture” these days. I’m a screenwriter with a hit-or-miss career … I would think that to pollute pop culture to such a degree that it warrants being eviscerated in a movie, one would need to be, you know, powerful. Visible. Ubiquitous. I’m none of those things … " she wrote. Cody goes on to say that she admires Goldthwait's work – citing Shakes the Clown as a favorite – and that she always saw the comedian as a kindred spirit. " … We both have silly aggro fake names, and we’ve both spent our careers (his long, mine short) trying to transcend the gimmicks we’re known for. Dear Bobcat: Juno is my “growly voice.” Let me evolve, as you have evolved." Stay classy, Diablo. Read her thoughts in full on The Playlist.
 
 
 
Has Lars von Trier jumped the shark yet with the Nazi hubbub? The director made some "sympathetic" comments about Hitler at Cannes earlier this year and was banned from the festival. Later, he brought the subject up again at a Q&A in Berlin. Now, the Melancholia director is saying he's not really sorry and his previous apology is null and void. "I don't think there is a right or wrong thing to say. I think that anything can be said. That is very much me ... To say I'm sorry for what I said is to say I'm sorry for what kind of a person I am, (and that) I'm sorry for my morals, and that would destroy me as a person," he told GQ Magazine
 
"It's not true. I'm not sorry. I am not sorry for what I said. I'm sorry that it didn't come out more clearly. I'm not sorry that I made a joke. But I'm sorry that I didn't make it clear that it was a joke. But I can't be sorry for what I said – it's against my nature ... but that's maybe where I'm really sick in my mind. You can't be sorry about something that's fundamentally you. Maybe I'm a freak in that sense." 
 
Despite the controversy surrounding his poorly worded comments, THR is reporting that buyers aren't being deterred from eyeing up Von Trier's latest, the pornographic Nymphomaniac – an exploration of female sexuality. The film – which is still in pre-production and expected to start shooting next summer – has already been bought up by Artificial Eye, Gutek Film, Aero Film, Wild Bunch, and Central Partnership. Are you riding the waves of controversy, or has Von Trier's latest rant turned you off for good?

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