Phew, Scientists Prove 'Jurassic Park' Cannot Happen in Real Life

Phew, Scientists Prove 'Jurassic Park' Cannot Happen in Real Life

Oct 11, 2012

 

We here at Movies.com love science, but sometimes science can be a real jerk face. In the case of Jurassic Park, science has crushed our dreams of prehistoric rage monsters destroying entire cities. Slashfilm feels the same and has reported that we'll have to depend on dino animatronics to reconstruct the massive creatures that roamed the earth, because apparently their DNA strands have all died. Done. Finished. Gone.
 
Researchers digging up fossils in New Zealand have concluded that the dino genetic material has a half-life of 521 years, so cloning the beasts would be impossible in this day and age. They figured this all out after examining 150-, 600- to 8,000-year-old DNA-filled leg bones belonging to three extinct species of birds called Moa, which were flightless (no wings at all!). Slashfilm reports, "even in the most ideal environment for preservation, all the nucleotide bonds in DNA would break down after 6.8 million years at most. In fact, the data in DNA would essentially be “unreadable” much earlier, perhaps only at 1.5 million years old."
 
That means no disgruntled Dennis Nedry, no violent T. rex, and no Steven Spielberg blockbuster brought to life. Try to pick up the pieces of your life and move on, or just go visit Orlando, Florida and wait in line at the theme park like everyone else. [via Nature]
 

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In the movie Endless Love, what is the name of the character played by Gabriella Wilde

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Jade Butterfield