The Movie-Related Things Our Writers Are Thankful for in 2012

The Movie-Related Things Our Writers Are Thankful for in 2012

Nov 22, 2012

We already asked you for the movie-related thing you're most thankful for this year, so now it's our turn. While you sit around stuffing your face full of turkey, football and Uncle Bob's bad, dirty jokes, we wanted to make sure you had something to read. Today is a day where we give thanks, and so we asked our writers here at Movies.com to tell you what movie-related things they're thankful for this year. 

Check out what we all had to say below, and follow the writer links over to their Twitter pages where you can stalk them daily for movie tips and leftover turkey recipes. Happy Thanksgiving all!

 

-- I'm just thankful that it's been a damn good year for movies. -- Erik Davis
 
-- My 3D TV. It's not only given me yet another reason to love my home theater setup, but it's like the lightbulb that went off over my head in regards to 3D. It's still not my preferred way to watch a movie, but I feel like I get it now. I get why certain filmmakers are so obsessed with it. It's the first time that watching a 3D movie hasn't felt like a compromise. It's the first time that there's not a part of me noticing ghosting images and what not. It just works. And it is beautiful. -- Peter Hall
 
-- I'm thankful for Pootie Tang. It's not from this year but it's the movie I'm thankful for every year, a perennial gift from cinema. Happy Pootie Tangsgiving to all people everywhere. -- Dave White
 
-- I'm thankful to finally get a U.S release of The Hole on Blu-ray and DVD this year. Long live Joe Dante! -- Scott Neumyer
 
-- I am thankful for Ridley Scott, who after making Alien and Blade Runner over 30 years ago finally returned to the realm of science fiction this year with Prometheus. I'll take seconds, please. -- Robert B. DeSalvo
 
-- Since I didn't much care for the Hulk movie, the Thor movie or the Captain America movie, I'm thankful that The Avengers was so great. Way not to screw that up one, guys. -- Alonso Duralde
 
 
-- There's a lot to love about 2012: an incredible performance by Daniel Day-Lewis as one of my personal heroes, the triumphant return of Agent 007 to the silver screen after a long absence, as well as the first highly successful (and quite good) comic book team-up film. I'm thankful for the return of beloved childhood favorites that protected the Earth (and its history) once again from the scum of the universe, as well as, largely, a return to form for the webslinger, in addition to an awesome adventure courtesy of a foul-mouthed teddy bear. What am I most thankful for, though? Probably the highly satisfying conclusion to the greatest cinematic interpretation of Gotham's Dark Knight, tying up the story of Bruce Wayne and giving a name to one of the grandest, long-form three act plays I've ever seen: The Dark Knight trilogy. -- Chris Clow
 
-- I'm thankful Joseph Kahn spent four million dollars himself to make Detention. Wish I could pay for the sequel. -- Fred Topel
 
-- I'm extremely thankful for the wide range of superhero movies we received this year. Rather than serving up a bunch of variations on a common tone, Hollywood gave us a dose of grim and gritty in The Dark Knight Rises, an amazingly bright, heroic, and fun team-up story with The Avengers, and a fantastic, over-achieving film like Chronicle that took superhero movies off the beaten path and into fresh, new territory. That each of these films were so successful despite being so different in tone and filmmaking style makes it feel like anything is possible when it comes to the genre, and that there's even more potential for superhero movies to surprise us and tell original stories that reach far beyond our expectations. - Rick Marshall 
 
-- That a film like Holy Motors can still get made. -- Jason Guerrasio
 
 
-- I am most thankful that I finally attended Fantastic Fest in Austin, Texas. I have loved SXSW and Cannes, but now Fantastic Fest is my favorite. The way it's run, the quality of the films, and the special events make this my new, one and only "must attend" festival. I wrote about my love here Part 1, and here Part 2. -- Jeff Bayer
 
-- I'm thankful for the big-screen return of Joss Whedon (The Avengers and The Cabin in the Woods) and also the return of that old oxymoron: intelligent entertainment. -- Jeffrey M. Anderson
 
-- The Hunger Games: After writing over 100,000 words about the project, building a relationship with the fandom and ultimately making The Hunger Games part of my life, it is immensely satisfying, rewarding and exciting that the film is everything I'd hoped it to be and more. I'm so incredibly thankful that Lionsgate, Gary Ross and the whole Hunger Games team took the beloved source material and did it justice, offering up an entertaining and truly rousing piece of cinema that, personally, justifies quite a bit of time, energy and passion, leaving me honored and proud to continue reporting on and supporting the budding franchise. -- Perri Nemiroff
 
-- I am thankful that after 10 years of trials, I will soon get to see The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey at a theater near me. However the film turns out I am thankful legalities, lawyers, studio bankruptcy, actors strikes and schedules have finally all been overcome. I am further thankful for filmmakers who push the boundaries of technology to further the technological realities of making the false look and feel real. Dolby Atmos, high frame rate and hopefully someday, bright, easy-to-see 3D will all enhance my theater experience. -- Larry D. Curtis
 
 
-- Holy Motors, James Bond, Joss Whedon, Nanni Moretti, and David Cronenberg to name a few. -- Alison Nastasi
 
-- I'm thankful for all the different streaming services and the multitude of films available in that format and download because it means I never have to leave my house to go to the video store. I'm also thankful that we don't have to rewind DVDs and Blu-ray discs, because rewinding VHS tapes sucked. -- Mike Bracken
 
-- Naturally, I'm the family member charged with entertainment outings during the holidays - and this year, I'm beyond thankful that there are so many beautifully-made, challenging and unique films in the theater to share with my loved ones. Half the fun of seeing a film is curating it for people you know will absolutely adore it, and rewatching it through their eyes. Cloud Atlas comes to mind immediately as a universal crowd pleaser - I've already seen it three times with different sets of friends, and I discover something new upon each viewing.
 
My mother and aunts will absolutely flip out over Anna Karenina - it's cinematically like nothing they've seen before, a combination of their two loves: theater and movies (with patented Joe Wright long shots melding them, how can you go wrong?) And my uncles and grandpa will love Skyfall, not just for its homage to classic Bond films, but because Deakins' cinematography and Mendes' directing (not to mention Bardem's villain) elevate the film beyond Bond - it's art. That's just the tip of the iceberg - 2012 has been a theater-going embarrassment of riches. We get the cinema we deserve - be sure to support these ambitious, visionary filmmakers so we can have more incredible years like this one! -- Katie Calautti
 
-- This year, I’ve been really thankful for Sarah Polley releasing two films I love and admire – Take This Waltz and Stories We Tell. That she can jump so fluidly between styles, themes and genres is a testament to her talent. -- Monika Bartyzel
 
-- I'm thankful for the number of big Hollywood films that actually had above average scripts with intelligent people behind their production--Skyfall, Lincoln, Argo, Cloud Atlas--and for genre films getting boosts--Whedon's Cabin in the Woods reinvigorating horror the way his Avengers did for superhero franchise films. And I'm pleased and thankful about the above-average quality of mainstream animated films: Brave, ParaNorman, Frankenweenie, Wreck-It Ralph. Maybe we'll still ultimately look to the art house for some of the most important work this year but at least there were some smart options in multiplexes. -- Craig Phillips

Categories:
Tags:
blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement

Facebook on Movies.com

The Burning Question

In the movie Planes: Fire & Rescue, what is the name of the character played by Wes Studi

  • Dr. Cameron McCarthy
  • Windlifter
  • Stefan
  • Michael
Get Answer Get New Question

Windlifter