The Fight Before the Oscars

The Fight Before the Oscars

Mar 04, 2010

OK, so the Winter Olympics just finished up after two weeks of nonstop images of people flying down hills and crashing into things. The great thing about watching these games (besides that) is getting a look at the sportsmanship; all these fantastic athletes from around the world high-fiving and congratulating each other on a job well done.

Does everyone want to win one of those medals? Of course they do. But they want to win it fair and square – they don’t want to tarnish the competition or shine a bad light upon it, and they don’t want to spread lies about other athletes or come up with some lame negative story in the hopes it will throw their competitor off their game. (Leave that up to NBC.)

Nope, because these athletes don’t work and play in Hollywood.

See, in Hollywood, there’s something called “the smear campaign,” and unfortunately it’s happening to Oscar frontrunner, The Hurt Locker. After one of that film’s producers stupidly sent a mass email to friends and colleagues asking them to push Hurt Locker and tell their Academy voting friends to mark down his film on their ballot, the Academy found out and banned the guy from attending the Oscars.

Not really because he sent the email, but because he threw in some meaningless little note about how he didn’t want a $500 million film (aka Avatar) to win. For that non-mention of the film, he was banned. And I probably should note here that one of the producers of the Oscars used to run 20th Century Fox, the studio who put out Avatar … but that’s neither here nor there, right?

Naturally, some members of the press turned this story into a “hot topic” right before voters were to hand in their ballots in an effort to hurt, well, The Hurt Locker’s chances of winning. If you think it’s a coincidence that all of a sudden real-life soldiers are upset with how it portrays them and the war (even though the film has been out for over 8 months now), then you’re a fool. It’s also no coincidence that right before ballots were to be handed in, the soldier who made an appearance in the original Playboy article the film was inspired by decided to up and sue the filmmakers for stealing his story, wanting, of course, lots of money for it.

Yeah, good one, pal – it’s a film with an $11 million budget it hasn’t even made back yet. You’ll be rich in no time!

Sad world we live in, right? That’s why I’ve always had a problem with the Oscars. It’s not a fair game. There’s no good sportsmanship, only fake smiles from people who secretly wish death and destruction upon the person nominated alongside them. Granted, this isn’t always the case, but it happens more often than it should (I’m looking at you Jack Nicholson – how do you get that front row seat every year even when you’re not nominated, anyway?).

The funniest thing about it all: No one cares. Jim, Joanne and their dysfunctional extended family don’t care about any of this. They’ll flip around the channels on Sunday, stumble across the Oscars, and the winner of Best Picture will get a nod, a “hmm, maybe we’ll catch that sometime” and then it’s off to bed. No one cares about Hollywood’s silly little sandbox fights … except Hollywood.

Maybe it’s about time they realize that, don’t ya think?

Categories: WTF, Hollywood!?
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