Bill Murray Answers the Internet's Questions About Garfield, Fans and the Other Funniest Stories of His Career

Bill Murray Answers the Internet's Questions About Garfield, Fans and the Other Funniest Stories of His Career

Jan 21, 2014

The Reddit AMA has become the Internet’s version of Inside the Actors Studio, and everyone fancies themselves a regular James Lipton. There have been some fantastic celebrity interviews on the website, but Bill Murray’s could easily be the best. The actor was promoting his role in the upcoming The Monuments Men, about a ragtag platoon sent to rescue artworks from the Nazis during World War II, due in theaters on February 7.

Perhaps the most amusing story Murray shares is about his involvement with the Garfield films. “I only read a few pages of it, and I kind of wanted to do a cartoon movie, because I had looked at the screenplay and it said 'Joel Cohen' on it. And I wasn't thinking clearly, but it was spelled Cohen, not Coen,” he told a Redditor. Hilarious. The rest of the AMA is equally brilliant. Read some of our favorite highlights, then head to the thread for the full Murray experience.

On the movie he had the most fun with:

Well, I did a film with Jim Jarmusch called Broken Flowers, but I really enjoyed that movie. I enjoyed the script that he wrote. He asked me if I could do a movie, and I said “I gotta stay home, but if you make a movie that i could shoot within one hour of my house, I’ll do it.” So he found those locations. And I did the movie. And when it was done, I thought “this movie is so good, I thought I should stop.” I didn’t think I could do any better than Broken Flowers, it’s a film that is completely realized, and beautiful, and I thought I had done all I could do to it as an actor. And then 6-7 months later someone asked me to work again, so I worked again, but for a few months I thought I couldn’t do any better than that.

On his oddest experience while living in Japan filming Lost in Translation:

The oddest… well, I was eating at a sushi bar. I would go to sushi bars with a book I had called “Making out in Japanese.” it was a small paperback book, with questions like “can we get into the back seat?” “do your parents know about me?” “do you have a curfew?” And I would say to the sushi chef “Do you have a curfew? Do your parents know about us? And can we get into the back seat?” And I would always have a lot of fun with that, but that one particular day, he said “would you like some fresh eel?” and I said “yes I would.” so he came back with a fresh eel, a live eel, and then he walked back behind a screen and came back in 10 seconds with a no-longer-alive eel. It was the freshest thing I had ever eaten in my life. It was such a funny moment to see something that was alive that no longer was alive, that was my food, in 30 seconds.

On one of his best memories about meeting a fan:

The best experience with a fan? It happens sometimes where someone will say “I was going through a really hard time. I was going through a really hard time, and I was just morose or depressed.” And I met one person who said I couldn’t find anything to cheer me up and I was so sad. And I Just watched Caddyshack, and I watched it for about a week and it was the only thing that cheered me up. And it was the only thing that cheered me up and made me laugh and made me think that my life wasn’t hopeless. That I had a way to see what was best about life, that there was a whole lot of life that was wonderful. And I happen to know (from her own spirit) that that person has really triumphed as an artist and as a human being, and if it’s just a moment when you can reverse a movement, an emotion, a downward spiral, when you can quiet something or still something and just allow it to change and allow the real spirit rise up in someone, that feels great. I know I’m not saving the world, but something in what I’ve learned how to do or the stories that I’ve tried to tell, they’re some sort of representation of how life is or how life could be. And that gives some sort of optimism. And an optimistic attitude is a successful attitude.

On filming Groundhog Day:

Well, that part was fine, the filming of the scenes over and over because you know that's what the story is. The scripts is one of the greatest conceptual scripts I've ever seen. It's a script that was so unique, so original, and yet it got not acclaim. To me it was no question that it was the greatest script of the year. To this day people are talking about it, but they forget no one paid any attention to it at the time. The execution of the script, there were great people in it. It was a difficult movie to shoot because we shot in winter outdoors. If you ever get to go to Puxatawney, you should go, it is one of the few things that is BETTER than advertised. It's really something to see. But doing the movie, shooting the scenes over and over, it's like an acting challenge. It's like doing a play and those same scenes over and over and again, so you can try to make it better or deeper or funnier than you made it previously.

 

MORE FROM AROUND THE WEB:

                ZergNet

Categories: News
Tags: Bill Murray
blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement

Facebook on Movies.com

The Burning Question

In the movie The Quiet Ones, what is the name of the character played by Max Pirkis

  • Dr. Ishiro Seriwaza
  • Spaceman Benny
  • David Q (Older)
  • Kaylie Russell
Get Answer Get New Question

David Q (Older)