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  • Men on Her Mind

  • Star Dust

  • The Great Profile

  • Last of the Wild Horses

  • Rockin' in the Rockies

  • Four Sons

  • Close to My Heart

  • Riders in the Sky

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  • The Lady Confesses

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Mary Beth Hughes Biography

  • Profession: Actor
  • Born: Nov 13, 1919
  • Died: Jan 1, 0001

Like her contemporaries [[Performer~P3924~Lynn Bari~lynnbari]] and [[Performer~P7428~Veda Ann Borg~vedaannborg]], blonde actress Mary Beth Hughes seldom rose above "starlet" or "second-echelon star" status, even though she worked steadily and enjoyed a loyal fan following. Encouraged to pursue a theatrical career by her grandmother, a onetime actress, Hughes went from stage to films in 1938. From 1940 through 1943, Hughes was part of the "B" stable at 20th Century-Fox, playing both good and bad girls in the popular Michael Shayne series with [[Performer~P52886~Lloyd Nolan~lloydnolan]], and going through the usual "other woman" paces in films like [[Feature~V36585~Orchestra Wives~orchestrawives]] (1942). She is billed second in the moody western The Ox-Bow Incident (1943), but her role is utterly expendable; in fact, she has fewer lines than [[Performer~P48204~George Meeker~georgemeeker]], the unbilled actor playing her husband. While her film career never really went anywhere, Hughes remained in the public eye through her many cheesecake photos in movie-oriented magazines of the era. In the mid-1950s, Hughes gave up films in favor of work as a nightclub singer/musician and television actress; she was often cast as nagging wife Clara Appleby on TV's [[Feature~V260285~The Red Skelton Show~theredskeltonshow[tvseries]]], possibly because she was one of the few actresses whom Skelton couldn't break up. Mary Beth Hughes briefly returned to filmmaking in the mid-1970s, playing character roles in such drive-in fare as The Working Girls (1974) and How's Your Love Life? (1977). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

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