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  • The Group

  • To Be or Not to Be

  • The Crucible

  • Police Academy 6: City Under Siege

  • Police Academy 3: Back in Training

  • Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment

  • Police Academy 5: Assignment Miami Beach

  • Stepmonster

  • Marooned

  • Micki + Maude

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George Gaynes Biography

  • Profession: Actor
  • Born: May 16, 1917
  • Died: Jan 1, 0001

Finnish-born actor George Gaynes was a United States citizen for most of his life. Blessed with a superb singing voice and an amiable stage presence, Gaynes rapidly built a reputation as a Broadway musical comedy performer in the '40s and '50s (his best-known appearance was in Wonderful Town, the musical version of My Sister Eileen). Entering films and television in the early 1960s, Gaynes was a regular on the TV daytime dramas [[Feature~V33418~Search for Tomorrow~motherlode]] and [[Feature~V135248~General Hospital~generalhospital]], and showed up in such movies as [[Feature~V20987~The Group~thegroup]] (1968), [[Feature~V31536~Marooned~marooned]] (1969) and [[Feature~V145271~Doctor's Wives~hustruer]] (1971). He was terrific in Dustin Hoffman's [[Feature~V50420~Tootsie~tootsie]] (1981) as the aging, libidinous soap opera actor who tries to put the make on his co-star "Dorothy Michaels," little suspecting that Dorothy is really the certifiably male Michael Dorsey ([[Performer~P178763~Hoffman~hoffman]]). In 1984, Gaynes was showcased on two different series, one on TV, the other on the big screen. The TV series was [[Feature~V39679~Punky Brewster~punkybrewster:punkypower]], wherein Gaynes played photographer Henry Warnimont, the adult guardian of the title character (a little lost girl, played by [[Performer~P25219~Soleil Moon Frye~soleilmoonfrye]]); when [[Feature~V39679~Punky Brewster~punkybrewster:punkypower]] was spun off into a cartoon series, Gaynes came along as one of the voice talents. The aforementioned big-screen series was launched with [[Feature~V38584~Police Academy~policeacademy]] (1984), a juvenile comedy that somehow spawned five sequels, all of them featuring Gaynes as long-suffering police chief Lassard. None of his subsequent appearances drew as many laughs as did George Gaynes' setpiece in the first film, in which, while trying to deliver a public speech, he was the unwitting (but increasingly ecstatic) recipient of a prostitute's services. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

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